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Regulating continent growth and composition by chemical weathering

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, March 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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37 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
Title
Regulating continent growth and composition by chemical weathering
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, March 2008
DOI 10.1073/pnas.0711143105
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cin-Ty Aeolus Lee, Douglas M. Morton, Mark G. Little, Ronald Kistler, Ulyana N. Horodyskyj, William P. Leeman, Arnaud Agranier

Abstract

Continents ride high above the ocean floor because they are underlain by thick, low-density, Si-rich, and Mg-poor crust. However, the parental magmas of continents were basaltic, which means they must have lost Mg relative to Si during their maturation into continents. Igneous differentiation followed by lower crustal delamination and chemical weathering followed by subduction recycling are possible solutions, but the relative magnitudes of each process have never been quantitatively constrained because of the lack of appropriate data. Here, we show that the relative contributions of these processes can be obtained by simultaneous examination of Mg and Li (an analog for Mg) on the regional and global scales in arcs, delaminated lower crust, and river waters. At least 20% of Mg is lost from continents by weathering, which translates into >20% of continental mass lost by weathering (40% by delamination). Chemical weathering leaves behind a more Si-rich and Mg-poor crust, which is less dense and hence decreases the probability of crustal recycling by subduction. Net continental growth is thus modulated by chemical weathering and likely influenced by secular changes in weathering mechanisms.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 5%
Australia 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Belgium 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 37 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 10 23%
Researcher 9 21%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Other 11 26%
Unknown 1 2%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 32 74%
Unspecified 4 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Chemistry 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 April 2014.
All research outputs
#3,552,652
of 12,364,927 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#42,783
of 77,321 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,260
of 266,881 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#639
of 979 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,364,927 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 77,321 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.1. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,881 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 979 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.