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Development and Characterization of a Novel, Anatomically Relevant Rat Model of Acute Postoperative Pain

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pain, May 2015
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Title
Development and Characterization of a Novel, Anatomically Relevant Rat Model of Acute Postoperative Pain
Published in
Journal of Pain, May 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.jpain.2015.01.010
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dara Bree, Orla Moriarty, Cliona M. O'Mahony, Bradley Morris, Karen Bannerton, Daniel C. Broom, John P. Kelly, Michelle Roche, David P. Finn

Abstract

Acute postoperative pain remains a significant healthcare issue. Development of anatomically relevant animal models of postoperative pain, with improved predictive validity, would advance understanding of postoperative pain mechanisms and improve treatment outcomes. This study aimed to develop, characterise and validate a rat model of acute postoperative pain associated with inguinal hernia repair based on the Lichtenstein inguinal hernia repair procedure (without hernia induction). We hypothesised that the surgery would result in reduced spontaneous locomotor activity which would represent a pain-related phenotype. Post-surgical characterisation involved extensive monitoring of home cage and open field locomotor activity, as well as mechanical hypersensitivity and assessment of c-Fos expression in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. In pharmacological validation studies, rats received morphine or carprofen 1h before, and/or immediately after, surgery. Rats that underwent hernia repair surgery exhibited significantly lower horizontal and vertical activity in the home cage and open field in the early post-surgical period, compared with sham rats or rats that underwent skin incision only. Morphine, carprofen and paracetamol attenuated the surgery-induced reductions in locomotor activity, to varying degrees. Surgery was associated with significantly increased c-Fos expression in the ipsilateral dorsal horn of the spinal cord, an effect attenuated by carprofen treatment. These results support the development and characterisation of a novel, anatomically relevant model of acute postoperative pain which may facilitate development of improved treatment regimes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Egypt 1 4%
Unknown 24 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 16%
Researcher 3 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Student > Master 3 12%
Other 3 12%
Other 9 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 48%
Unspecified 4 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 12%
Neuroscience 3 12%
Psychology 1 4%
Other 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 January 2015.
All research outputs
#3,929,846
of 4,691,566 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pain
#689
of 822 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,443
of 163,568 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pain
#35
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,691,566 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 822 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.