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Boosting tendon repair: interplay of cells, growth factors and scaffold-free and gel-based carriers

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics, January 2018
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Title
Boosting tendon repair: interplay of cells, growth factors and scaffold-free and gel-based carriers
Published in
Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40634-017-0117-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zexing Yan, Heyong Yin, Michael Nerlich, Christian G. Pfeifer, Denitsa Docheva

Abstract

Tendons are dense connective tissues and critical components for the integrity and function of the musculoskeletal system. Tendons connect bone to muscle and transmit forces on which locomotion entirely depends. Due to trauma, overuse and age-related degeneration, many people suffer from acute or chronic tendon injuries. Owing to their hypovascularity and hypocellularity, tendinopathies remain a substantial challenge for both clinicians and researchers. Surgical treatment includes suture or transplantation of autograft, allograft or xenograft, and these serve as the most common technique for rescuing tendon injuries. However, the therapeutic efficacies are limited by drawbacks including inevitable donor site morbidity, poor graft integration, adhesion formations and high rates of recurrent tearing. This review summarizes the literature of the past 10 y concerning scaffold-free and gel-based approaches for treating tendon injuries, with emphasis on specific advantages of such modes of application, as well as the obtained results regarding in vitro and in vivo tenogenesis. The search was focused on publications released after 2006 and 83 articles have been analysed. The main results are summarizing and discussing the clear advantages of scaffold-free and hydrogels carriers that can be functionalized with cells alone or in combination with growth factors. The improved understanding of tissue resident adult stem cells has made a significant progress in recent years as well as strategies to steer their fate toward tendon lineage, with the help of growth factors, have been identified. The field of tendon tissue engineering is exploring diverse models spanning from hard scaffolds to gel-based and scaffold-free approaches seeking easier cell delivery and integration in the site of injury. Still, the field needs to consider a multifactorial approach that is based on the combination and fine-tuning of chemical and biomechanical stimuli. Taken together, tendon tissue engineering has now excellent foundations and enters the period of precision and translation to models with clinical relevance on which better treatment options of tendon injuries can be shaped up.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 37%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 9%
Researcher 2 6%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 3%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 8 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 26%
Engineering 4 11%
Physics and Astronomy 4 11%
Chemical Engineering 2 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 11 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 January 2018.
All research outputs
#10,986,110
of 12,362,966 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics
#42
of 55 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#298,201
of 355,627 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics
#3
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,362,966 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 55 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 355,627 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.