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A role for endothelial nitric oxide synthase in intestinal stem cell proliferation and mesenchymal colorectal cancer

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, January 2018
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2 tweeters

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Title
A role for endothelial nitric oxide synthase in intestinal stem cell proliferation and mesenchymal colorectal cancer
Published in
BMC Biology, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12915-017-0472-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jon Peñarando, Laura M. López-Sánchez, Rafael Mena, Silvia Guil-Luna, Francisco Conde, Vanessa Hernández, Marta Toledano, Victoria Gudiño, Michela Raponi, Caroline Billard, Carlos Villar, César Díaz, José Gómez-Barbadillo, Juan De la Haba-Rodríguez, Kevin Myant, Enrique Aranda, Antonio Rodríguez-Ariza

Abstract

Nitric oxide (NO) has been highlighted as an important agent in cancer-related events. Although the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) isoform has received most attention, recent studies in the literature indicate that the endothelial isoenzyme (eNOS) can also modulate different tumor processes including resistance, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. However, the role of eNOS in cancer stem cell (CSC) biology and mesenchymal tumors is unknown. Here, we show that eNOS was significantly upregulated in VilCre ERT2 Apc fl/+ and VilCre ERT2 Apc fl/fl mouse intestinal tissue, with intense immunostaining in hyperproliferative crypts. Similarly, the more invasive VilCre ERT2 Apc fl/+ Pten fl/+ mouse model showed an overexpression of eNOS in intestinal tumors whereas this isoform was not expressed in normal tissue. However, none of the three models showed iNOS expression. Notably, when 40 human colorectal tumors were classified into different clinically relevant molecular subtypes, high eNOS expression was found in the poor relapse-free and overall survival mesenchymal subtype, whereas iNOS was absent. Furthermore, Apc fl/fl organoids overexpressed eNOS compared with wild-type organoids and NO depletion with the scavenger carboxy-PTIO (c-PTIO) decreased the proliferation and the expression of stem-cell markers, such as Lgr5, Troy, Vav3, and Slc14a1, in these intestinal organoids. Moreover, specific NO depletion also decreased the expression of CSC-related proteins in human colorectal cancer cells such as β-catenin and Bmi1, impairing the CSC phenotype. To rule out the contribution of iNOS in this effect, we established an iNOS-knockdown colorectal cancer cell line. NO-depleted cells showed a decreased capacity to form tumors and c-PTIO treatment in vivo showed an antitumoral effect in a xenograft mouse model. Our data support that eNOS upregulation occurs after Apc loss, emerging as an unexpected potential new target in poor-prognosis mesenchymal colorectal tumors, where NO scavenging could represent an interesting therapeutic alternative to targeting the CSC subpopulation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 25%
Researcher 6 21%
Student > Bachelor 5 18%
Professor 1 4%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 11%
Engineering 2 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 7%
Other 5 18%
Unknown 8 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 January 2018.
All research outputs
#12,721,373
of 16,669,654 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#1,318
of 1,448 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#312,785
of 464,901 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#120
of 128 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,669,654 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,448 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.5. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 464,901 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 128 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.