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The association between psychotic experiences and traumatic life events: the role of the intention to harm

Overview of attention for article published in Psychological Medicine, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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11 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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41 Mendeley
Title
The association between psychotic experiences and traumatic life events: the role of the intention to harm
Published in
Psychological Medicine, January 2018
DOI 10.1017/s0033291717003762
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tais Silveira Moriyama, Marjan Drukker, Ary Gadelha, Pedro Mario Pan, Giovanni Abrahão Salum, Gisele Gus Manfro, Jair de Jesus Mari, Eurípedes Constantino Miguel, Luis Augusto Rohde, Guilherme Vanoni Polanczyk, Jim van Os, Rodrigo Affonseca Bressan

Abstract

Previous work showed traumatic life events (TLE) with intention to harm, like bullying and abuse, to be more strongly associated with psychotic experiences (PE) than other types of trauma, like accidents. However, this association is subject to reporting bias and can be confounded by demographic characteristics and by differences in dose of exposure across different trauma categories. We studied the association between TLE with and without intention to harm and PE, taking into account potential confounders and biases. A total of 2245 children and adolescents aged 6-14 years were interviewed by psychologists. The interview included the presence of 20 PE (both self-report and psychologist evaluation). In addition, parents provided information on child exposure to trauma, mental health and PE. Results showed no significant association between TLE without intention to harm only and PE for the three methods of assessment of PE (self-report, parent report and psychologist rating). On the other hand, there was a positive association between PE and TLE in groups exposed to traumatic experiences with intention to harm (with intention to harm only and with and without intention to harm). Results remained significant after controlling for demographic and clinical confounders, but this positive association was no longer significant after adjusting for the number of TLE. TLE with intention to harm display a stronger association with PE than TLE without intention to harm, and this difference is likely reducible to a greater level of traumatic exposure associated with TLE with intention to harm.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 8 20%
Student > Master 7 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Student > Postgraduate 4 10%
Other 4 10%
Other 12 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 12 29%
Unspecified 12 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 20%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 5%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 5 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 January 2018.
All research outputs
#2,406,170
of 13,628,213 outputs
Outputs from Psychological Medicine
#1,114
of 3,708 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,376
of 439,428 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychological Medicine
#37
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,628,213 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,708 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 439,428 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.