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Association of circadian rhythm genes ARNTL/BMAL1 and CLOCK with multiple sclerosis

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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43 Mendeley
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Title
Association of circadian rhythm genes ARNTL/BMAL1 and CLOCK with multiple sclerosis
Published in
PLOS ONE, January 2018
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0190601
Pubmed ID
Authors

Polona Lavtar, Gorazd Rudolf, Aleš Maver, Alenka Hodžić, Nada Starčević Čizmarević, Maja Živković, Saša Šega Jazbec, Zalika Klemenc Ketiš, Miljenko Kapović, Evica Dinčić, Ranko Raičević, Juraj Sepčić, Luca Lovrečić, Aleksandra Stanković, Smiljana Ristić, Borut Peterlin

Abstract

Prevalence of multiple sclerosis varies with geographic latitude. We hypothesized that this fact might be partially associated with the influence of latitude on circadian rhythm and consequently that genetic variability of key circadian rhythm regulators, ARNTL and CLOCK genes, might contribute to the risk for multiple sclerosis. Our aim was to analyse selected polymorphisms of ARNTL and CLOCK, and their association with multiple sclerosis. A total of 900 Caucasian patients and 1024 healthy controls were compared for genetic signature at 8 SNPs, 4 for each of both genes. We found a statistically significant difference in genotype (ARNTL rs3789327, P = 7.5·10-5; CLOCK rs6811520 P = 0.02) distributions in patients and controls. The ARNTL rs3789327 CC genotype was associated with higher risk for multiple sclerosis at an OR of 1.67 (95% CI 1.35-2.07, P = 0.0001) and the CLOCK rs6811520 genotype CC at an OR of 1.40 (95% CI 1.13-1.73, P = 0.002). The results of this study suggest that genetic variability in the ARNTL and CLOCK genes might be associated with risk for multiple sclerosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 9%
Professor 3 7%
Other 10 23%
Unknown 12 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 9 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 5%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 16 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2019.
All research outputs
#2,544,155
of 18,688,947 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#33,766
of 170,128 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,432
of 380,704 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#911
of 4,713 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,688,947 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 170,128 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 380,704 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,713 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.