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Determinants of Pseudogymnoascus destructans within bat hibernacula: Implications for surveillance and management of white-nose syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Applied Ecology, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
24 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
33 Mendeley
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Title
Determinants of Pseudogymnoascus destructans within bat hibernacula: Implications for surveillance and management of white-nose syndrome
Published in
Journal of Applied Ecology, January 2018
DOI 10.1111/1365-2664.13070
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michelle L. Verant, Elizabeth A. Bohuski, Katherine L. D. Richgels, Kevin J. Olival, Jonathan H. Epstein, David S. Blehert

Abstract

1. Fungal diseases are an emerging global problem affecting human health, food security and biodiversity. Ability of many fungal pathogens to persist within environmental reservoirs can increase extinction risks for host species and presents challenges for disease control. Understanding factors that regulate pathogen spread and persistence in these reservoirs is critical for effective disease management. 2. White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a disease of hibernating bats caused byPseudogymnoascus destructans(Pd), a fungus that establishes persistent environmental reservoirs within bat hibernacula, which contribute to seasonal disease transmission dynamics in bats. However, host and environmental factors influencing distribution ofPdwithin these reservoirs are unknown. 3. We used model selection on longitudinally collected field data to test multiple hypotheses describing presence-absence and abundance ofPdin environmental substrates and on bats within hibernacula at different stages of WNS. 4. First detection ofPdin the environment lagged up to one year after first detection on bats within that hibernaculum. Once detected, the probability of detectingPdwithin environmental samples from a hibernaculum increased over time and was higher in sediment compared to wall surfaces. Temperature had marginal effects on the distribution ofPd. For bats, prevalence and abundance ofPdwere highest onMyotis lucifugusand on bats with visible signs of WNS. 5.Synthesis and applications. Our results indicate that distribution ofPseudogymnoascus destructans(Pd) within a hibernaculum is driven primarily by bats with delayed establishment of environmental reservoirs. Thus, collection of samples fromMyotis lucifugus, or from sediment if bats cannot be sampled, should be prioritized to improve detection probabilities forPdsurveillance. Long-term persistence ofPdin sediment suggests that disease management for white-nose syndrome should address risks of sustained transmission from environmental reservoirs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 24 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 18%
Student > Bachelor 6 18%
Unspecified 5 15%
Student > Postgraduate 4 12%
Researcher 4 12%
Other 8 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 52%
Environmental Science 5 15%
Unspecified 4 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 6%
Other 3 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 April 2018.
All research outputs
#658,474
of 12,755,705 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Applied Ecology
#551
of 2,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,663
of 344,781 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Applied Ecology
#52
of 107 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,755,705 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,390 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,781 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 107 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.