↓ Skip to main content

Pesticide Urinary Metabolites Among Latina Farmworkers and Nonfarmworkers in North Carolina

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine, January 2018
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Pesticide Urinary Metabolites Among Latina Farmworkers and Nonfarmworkers in North Carolina
Published in
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine, January 2018
DOI 10.1097/jom.0000000000001189
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas A. Arcury, Paul J. Laurienti, Jennifer W. Talton, Haiying Chen, Timothy D. Howard, Dana B. Barr, Dana C. Mora, Sara A. Quandt

Abstract

This paper compares detections and concentrations of pesticide urinary metabolites for Latina farmworkers and non-farmworkers in North Carolina. Thirty-one farmworkers and 55 non-farmworkers provided urine samples in 2012 and 2013. Urine samples were analyzed for detections and concentrations of organophosphate insecticide, bis-dithiocarbamate fungicide, and pyrethroid insecticide urinary metabolites. Detections for several organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticide urinary metabolites were present for substantial proportions of the farmworkers and non-farmworkers. Concentrations for several of these metabolites were high. Farmworkers and non-farmworkers were similar in detections and concentrations for the pesticide urinary metabolites included in this analysis. Participant pesticide exposure increases health risks for them and their children. Research needs to document pesticide exposure, its health effects, and ways to reduce it. Current information justifies policy development to reduce pesticide exposure in all communities.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 2 18%
Student > Master 2 18%
Unspecified 2 18%
Other 1 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 9%
Other 3 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 3 27%
Environmental Science 2 18%
Engineering 2 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 9%
Neuroscience 1 9%
Other 2 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 January 2018.
All research outputs
#10,996,297
of 12,373,969 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine
#3,198
of 3,458 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#284,597
of 338,003 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine
#59
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,969 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,458 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 338,003 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.