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The stage of soil development modulates rhizosphere effect along a High Arctic desert chronosequence

Overview of attention for article published in ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
59 Mendeley
Title
The stage of soil development modulates rhizosphere effect along a High Arctic desert chronosequence
Published in
ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology, January 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41396-017-0026-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francesca Mapelli, Ramona Marasco, Marco Fusi, Barbara Scaglia, George Tsiamis, Eleonora Rolli, Stilianos Fodelianakis, Kostas Bourtzis, Stefano Ventura, Fulvia Tambone, Fabrizio Adani, Sara Borin, Daniele Daffonchio

Abstract

In mature soils, plant species and soil type determine the selection of root microbiota. Which of these two factors drives rhizosphere selection in barren substrates of developing desert soils has, however, not yet been established. Chronosequences of glacier forelands provide ideal natural environments to identify primary rhizosphere selection factors along the changing edaphic conditions of a developing soil. Here, we analyze changes in bacterial diversity in bulk soils and rhizospheres of a pioneer plant across a High Arctic glacier chronosequence. We show that the developmental stage of soil strongly modulates rhizosphere community assembly, even though plant-induced selection buffers the effect of changing edaphic factors. Bulk and rhizosphere soils host distinct bacterial communities that differentially vary along the chronosequence. Cation exchange capacity, exchangeable potassium, and metabolite concentration in the soil account for the rhizosphere bacterial diversity. Although the soil fraction (bulk soil and rhizosphere) explains up to 17.2% of the variation in bacterial microbiota, the soil developmental stage explains up to 47.7% of this variation. In addition, the operational taxonomic unit (OTU) co-occurrence network of the rhizosphere, whose complexity increases along the chronosequence, is loosely structured in barren compared with mature soils, corroborating our hypothesis that soil development tunes the rhizosphere effect.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 25%
Researcher 14 24%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Professor 4 7%
Student > Master 3 5%
Other 11 19%
Unknown 7 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 34%
Environmental Science 14 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 10%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 3%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 12 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 March 2018.
All research outputs
#474,759
of 13,323,590 outputs
Outputs from ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
#234
of 2,111 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,717
of 347,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age from ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
#22
of 83 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,323,590 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,111 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 347,355 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 83 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.