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The role of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurones in feeding behaviour

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition & Metabolism, January 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
162 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
305 Mendeley
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Title
The role of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurones in feeding behaviour
Published in
Nutrition & Metabolism, January 2007
DOI 10.1186/1743-7075-4-18
Pubmed ID
Authors

George WM Millington

Abstract

The precursor protein, proopiomelanocortin (POMC), produces many biologically active peptides via a series of enzymatic steps in a tissue-specific manner, yielding the melanocyte-stimulating hormones (MSHs), corticotrophin (ACTH) and beta-endorphin. The MSHs and ACTH bind to the extracellular G-protein coupled melanocortin receptors (MCRs) of which there are five subtypes. The MC3R and MC4R show widespread expression in the central nervous system (CNS), whilst there is low level expression of MC1R and MC5R. In the CNS, cell bodies for POMC are mainly located in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and the nucleus tractus solitarius of the brainstem. Both of these areas have well defined functions relating to appetite and food intake. Mouse knockouts (ko) for pomc, mc4r and mc3r all show an obese phenotype, as do humans expressing mutations of POMC and MC4R. Recently, human subjects with specific mutations in beta-MSH have been found to be obese too, as have mice with engineered beta-endorphin deficiency. The CNS POMC system has other functions, including regulation of sexual behaviour, lactation, the reproductive cycle and possibly central cardiovascular control. However, this review will focus on feeding behaviour and link it in with the neuroanatomy of the POMC neurones in the hypothalamus and brainstem.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 305 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 6 2%
United States 3 <1%
Austria 2 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 287 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 61 20%
Student > Master 53 17%
Student > Bachelor 53 17%
Researcher 41 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 21 7%
Other 47 15%
Unknown 29 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 98 32%
Neuroscience 49 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 42 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 37 12%
Psychology 10 3%
Other 27 9%
Unknown 42 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 49. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 December 2016.
All research outputs
#354,192
of 13,482,428 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition & Metabolism
#83
of 683 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,356
of 279,613 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition & Metabolism
#2
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,482,428 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 683 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,613 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.