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Soil-vegetation relationships on a banded ironstone 'island', Carajás Plateau, Brazilian Eastern Amazonia

Overview of attention for article published in Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, December 2015
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Title
Soil-vegetation relationships on a banded ironstone 'island', Carajás Plateau, Brazilian Eastern Amazonia
Published in
Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, December 2015
DOI 10.1590/0001-376520152014-0106
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jaquelina A. Nunes, Carlos E.G.R. Schaefer, Walnir G. Ferreira Júnior, Andreza V. Neri, Guilherme R. Correa, Neal J. Enright

Abstract

Vegetation and soil properties of an iron-rich canga (laterite) island on the largest outcrop of banded-iron formation in Serra de Carajás (eastern Amazonia, Brazil) were studied along a topographic gradient (738-762 m asl), and analyzed to test the hypothesis that soil chemical and physical attributes play a key role in the structure and floristic composition of these plant communities. Soil and vegetation were sampled in eight replicate plots within each of the four vegetation types. Surface (0-10 cm) soil samples from each plot were analyzed for basic cations, N, P and plant species density for all species was recorded. CCA ordination analysis showed a strong separation between forest and non-forest sites on the first axis, and between herbaceous and shrubby campo rupestre on the second axis. The four vegetation types shared few plant species, which was attributed to their distinctive soil environments and filtering of their constituent species by chemical, physical and hydrological constraints. Thus, we can infer that Edaphic (pedological) factors are crucial in explaining the types and distributions of campo rupestre vegetation associated with ferruginous ironstone uplands (Canga) in Carajás, eastern Amazonia, therefore the soil properties are the main drivers of vegetation composition and structure on these ironstone islands.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 71 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 11%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Professor 6 8%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 10 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 32%
Environmental Science 16 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 4%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 16 23%