↓ Skip to main content

Resting-State Functional MRI: Everything That Nonexperts Have Always Wanted to Know

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Neuroradiology, January 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#16 of 4,912)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
13 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
22 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
247 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
850 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Resting-State Functional MRI: Everything That Nonexperts Have Always Wanted to Know
Published in
American Journal of Neuroradiology, January 2018
DOI 10.3174/ajnr.a5527
Pubmed ID
Authors

H. Lv, Z. Wang, E. Tong, L.M. Williams, G. Zaharchuk, M. Zeineh, A.N. Goldstein-Piekarski, T.M. Ball, C. Liao, M. Wintermark

Abstract

Resting-state fMRI was first described by Biswal et al in 1995 and has since then been widely used in both healthy subjects and patients with various neurologic, neurosurgical, and psychiatric disorders. As opposed to paradigm- or task-based functional MR imaging, resting-state fMRI does not require subjects to perform any specific task. The low-frequency oscillations of the resting-state fMRI signal have been shown to relate to the spontaneous neural activity. There are many ways to analyze resting-state fMRI data. In this review article, we will briefly describe a few of these and highlight the advantages and limitations of each. This description is to facilitate the adoption and use of resting-state fMRI in the clinical setting, helping neuroradiologists become familiar with these techniques and applying them for the care of patients with neurologic and psychiatric diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 22 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 850 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 850 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 156 18%
Student > Master 125 15%
Researcher 107 13%
Student > Bachelor 95 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 61 7%
Other 129 15%
Unknown 177 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 194 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 117 14%
Psychology 92 11%
Engineering 56 7%
Computer Science 27 3%
Other 110 13%
Unknown 254 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 123. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 January 2023.
All research outputs
#287,666
of 23,033,713 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Neuroradiology
#16
of 4,912 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,509
of 441,957 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Neuroradiology
#1
of 83 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,033,713 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,912 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 441,957 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 83 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.