↓ Skip to main content

Molecular evolution and diversification of the Argonaute family of proteins in plants

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Plant Biology, January 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
94 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Molecular evolution and diversification of the Argonaute family of proteins in plants
Published in
BMC Plant Biology, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12870-014-0364-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ravi K Singh, Klaus Gase, Ian T Baldwin, Shree P Pandey

Abstract

BackgroundArgonaute (AGO) proteins form the core of the RNA-induced silencing complex, a central component of the smRNA machinery. Although reported from several plant species, little is known about their evolution. Moreover, these genes have not yet been cloned from the ecological model plant, Nicotiana attenuata, in which the smRNA machinery is known to mediate important ecological traits.ResultsHere, we not only identify 11 AGOs in N. attenuata, we further annotate 133 genes in 17 plant species, previously not annotated in the Phytozome database, to increase the number of plant AGOs to 263 genes from 37 plant species. We report the phylogenetic classification, expansion, and diversification of AGOs in the plant kingdom, which resulted in the following hypothesis about their evolutionary history: an ancestral AGO underwent duplication events after the divergence of unicellular green algae, giving rise to four major classes with subsequent gains/losses during the radiation of higher plants, resulting in the large number of extant AGOs. Class-specific signatures in the RNA-binding and catalytic domains, which may contribute to the functional diversity of plant AGOs, as well as context-dependent changes in sequence and domain architecture that may have consequences for gene function were found.ConclusionsTogether, the results demonstrate that the evolution of AGOs has been a dynamic process producing the signatures of functional diversification in the smRNA pathways of higher plants.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Norway 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Sweden 1 1%
India 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 89 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 27%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 10%
Student > Master 4 4%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 7 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 56 60%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 22 23%
Environmental Science 3 3%
Computer Science 2 2%
Chemistry 1 1%
Other 1 1%
Unknown 9 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 January 2015.
All research outputs
#2,495,815
of 4,691,566 outputs
Outputs from BMC Plant Biology
#363
of 825 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,270
of 163,850 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Plant Biology
#31
of 56 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,691,566 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 825 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 163,850 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 56 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.