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Comparative efficacy of three active treatment modules on psychosocial variables in patients with long-term mechanical low-back pain: a randomized-controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Physiotherapy, September 2015
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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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4 Dimensions

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32 Mendeley
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Title
Comparative efficacy of three active treatment modules on psychosocial variables in patients with long-term mechanical low-back pain: a randomized-controlled trial
Published in
Archives of Physiotherapy, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40945-015-0010-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chidozie Emmanuel Mbada, Olusola Ayanniyi, Samuel Olusegun Ogunlade

Abstract

Psychosocial factors precipitate and perpetuate the risk of developing long-term Low-Back Pain (LBP) with resultant disability. However, management of psychosocial aspects of LBP still remains a major challenge. This study investigated the effect of static or dynamic back extensors endurance exercise on psychosocial variables of Fear-Avoidance Behaviour (FAB), Pain Self-Efficacy Belief (PSEB) and Back Pain Consequences Belief (BPCB) in patients with LBP. A randomized-controlled trial of 67 patients assigned into McKenzie Protocol (MP) group (n = 25), MP and Static Endurance Exercise Group (MPSEEG; n = 22); and MP and Dynamic Endurance Exercise Group (MPDEEG; n = 20) was carried out. Treatment was applied thrice weekly for eight weeks. The groups were comparable in general and baseline psychosocial parameters (p > 0.05). The different regimens had significant effects on all outcome parameters across baseline, 4th and 8th week (p < 0.05). The regimens were comparable in mean change scores on BPCB and FAB at the 4th and 8th week respectively (p > 0.05). MPDBEEG had higher mean change in PSEB at the 4th and 8th week respectively. McKenzie Protocol alone, or in combination with static or dynamic back extensors endurance exercise has comparable effect on FAB, PSEB and BPCB in patients with LBP. The addition of dynamic endurance exercise to the MP led to significantly higher positive effects on PSEB.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 22%
Student > Bachelor 7 22%
Unspecified 4 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Other 3 9%
Other 7 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 13 41%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 31%
Unspecified 5 16%
Sports and Recreations 2 6%
Neuroscience 1 3%
Other 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2018.
All research outputs
#7,846,822
of 13,017,042 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Physiotherapy
#39
of 49 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#181,478
of 346,072 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Physiotherapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,017,042 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 49 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one scored the same or higher as 10 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,072 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them