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Infrared heater system for warming tropical forest understory plants and soils

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology and Evolution, January 2018
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

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4 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

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22 Mendeley
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Title
Infrared heater system for warming tropical forest understory plants and soils
Published in
Ecology and Evolution, January 2018
DOI 10.1002/ece3.3780
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bruce A. Kimball, Aura M. Alonso-Rodríguez, Molly A. Cavaleri, Sasha C. Reed, Grizelle González, Tana E. Wood

Abstract

The response of tropical forests to global warming is one of the largest uncertainties in predicting the future carbon balance of Earth. To determine the likely effects of elevated temperatures on tropical forest understory plants and soils, as well as other ecosystems, an infrared (IR) heater system was developed to provide in situ warming for the Tropical Responses to Altered Climate Experiment (TRACE) in the Luquillo Experimental Forest in Puerto Rico. Three replicate heated 4-m-diameter plots were warmed to maintain a 4°C increase in understory vegetation compared to three unheated control plots, as sensed by IR thermometers. The equipment was larger than any used previously and was subjected to challenges different from those of many temperate ecosystem warming systems, including frequent power surges and outages, high humidity, heavy rains, hurricanes, saturated clayey soils, and steep slopes. The system was able to maintain the target 4.0°C increase in hourly average vegetation temperatures to within ± 0.1°C. The vegetation was heterogeneous and on a 21° slope, which decreased uniformity of the warming treatment on the plots; yet, the green leaves were fairly uniformly warmed, and there was little difference among 0-10 cm depth soil temperatures at the plot centers, edges, and midway between. Soil temperatures at the 40-50 cm depth increased about 3°C compared to the controls after a month of warming. As expected, the soil in the heated plots dried faster than that of the control plots, but the average soil moisture remained adequate for the plants. The TRACE heating system produced an adequately uniform warming precisely controlled down to at least 50-cm soil depth, thereby creating a treatment that allows for assessing mechanistic responses of tropical plants and soil to warming, with applicability to other ecosystems. No physical obstacles to scaling the approach to taller vegetation (i.e., trees) and larger plots were observed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 18%
Student > Master 3 14%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Professor 1 5%
Other 5 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 45%
Environmental Science 8 36%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 5%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Engineering 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 April 2019.
All research outputs
#4,001,151
of 13,571,692 outputs
Outputs from Ecology and Evolution
#2,013
of 4,049 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,821
of 350,493 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology and Evolution
#107
of 234 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,571,692 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,049 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.5. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 350,493 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 234 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.