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The Potential Use of Peptides in Cancer Treatment

Overview of attention for article published in Current Protein & Peptide Science, June 2018
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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29 Mendeley
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Title
The Potential Use of Peptides in Cancer Treatment
Published in
Current Protein & Peptide Science, June 2018
DOI 10.2174/1389203719666180111150008
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bahram Yavari, Reza Mahjub, Masoud Saidijam, Mozhgan Raigani, Meysam Soleimani

Abstract

Conventional chemotherapeutic drugs have significant limitations: For example, tumors may develop resistance to them, cancers may relapse after treatment, and the drugs may induce secondary malignancies in the treatment of metastatic cancer. There is still a great need for drugs that are able to destroy cancer cells selectively, that is, to effectively treat slow-growing and dormant cells without being affected by chemoresistance mechanisms. A growing number of studies indicate that peptides may be beneficial for drug discovery and development. Peptides offer minimal immunogenicity, excellent tissue penetrability, low-cost manufacturability, and ease of modification for enhancing in vivo stability and biological activity, properties which make them an ideal candidate for cancer treatment. This review highlights recent advances in and future prospects for the application of peptides as a therapeutic agent for cancer therapy. We discuss the application of peptides in cancer therapy, alone and in combination with other peptides or small-molecule chemotherapeutic drugs, for use in targeted cancer therapy. Furthermore, we consider the use of peptides as a carrier of targeted molecular imaging in the diagnosis and follow-up treatment of cancer. This account also reviews the challenges of using drugs and ways to overcome this limitation. The results obtained in studies presented in this paper indicate that peptides are promising candidates for targeted cancer therapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 17%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Other 2 7%
Librarian 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 8 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 24%
Chemistry 3 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 7%
Engineering 2 7%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 9 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2018.
All research outputs
#10,008,146
of 12,505,595 outputs
Outputs from Current Protein & Peptide Science
#275
of 393 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#246,534
of 341,273 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Protein & Peptide Science
#4
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,505,595 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 393 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 341,273 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.