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Effect of provincial spending on social services and health care on health outcomes in Canada: an observational longitudinal study

Overview of attention for article published in CMAJ, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#16 of 5,035)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
13 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
463 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Readers on

mendeley
19 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of provincial spending on social services and health care on health outcomes in Canada: an observational longitudinal study
Published in
CMAJ, January 2018
DOI 10.1503/cmaj.170132
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dutton, Daniel J., Forest, Pierre-Gerlier, Kneebone, Ronald D., Zwicker, Jennifer D., Daniel J. Dutton, Pierre-Gerlier Forest, Ronald D. Kneebone, Jennifer D. Zwicker

Abstract

Escalating health care spending is a concern in Western countries, given the lack of evidence of a direct connection between spending and improvements in health. We aimed to determine the association between spending on health care and social programs and health outcomes in Canada. We used retrospective data from Canadian provincial expenditure reports, for the period 1981 to 2011, to model the effects of social and health spending (as a ratio, social/health) on potentially avoidable mortality, infant mortality and life expectancy. We used linear regressions, accounting for provincial fixed effects and time, and controlling for confounding variables at the provincial level. A 1-cent increase in social spending per dollar spent on health was associated with a 0.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.04% to 0.16%) decrease in potentially avoidable mortality and a 0.01% (95% CI 0.01% to 0.02%) increase in life expectancy. The ratio had a statistically nonsignificant relationship with infant mortality (p = 0.2). Population-level health outcomes could benefit from a reallocation of government dollars from health to social spending, even if total government spending were left unchanged. This result is consistent with other findings from Canada and the United States.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 463 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 4 21%
Student > Postgraduate 4 21%
Student > Master 3 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 11%
Other 4 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 63%
Social Sciences 3 16%
Unspecified 1 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Other 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 512. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 February 2018.
All research outputs
#9,682
of 9,108,370 outputs
Outputs from CMAJ
#16
of 5,035 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#485
of 187,833 outputs
Outputs of similar age from CMAJ
#1
of 80 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,108,370 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,035 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 187,833 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 80 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.