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Efficacy of melatonin for sleep disturbance following traumatic brain injury: a randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

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24 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
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1 research highlight platform

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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79 Mendeley
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Title
Efficacy of melatonin for sleep disturbance following traumatic brain injury: a randomised controlled trial
Published in
BMC Medicine, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12916-017-0995-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Natalie A. Grima, Shantha M. W. Rajaratnam, Darren Mansfield, Tracey L. Sletten, Gershon Spitz, Jennie L. Ponsford

Abstract

The study aimed to determine the efficacy of melatonin supplementation for sleep disturbances in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). This is a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled two-period two-treatment (melatonin and placebo) crossover study. Outpatients were recruited from Epworth and Austin Hospitals Melbourne, Australia. They had mild to severe TBI (n = 33) reporting sleep disturbances post-injury (mean age 37 years, standard deviation 11 years; 67% men). They were given prolonged-release melatonin formulation (2 mg; Circadin®) and placebo capsules for 4 weeks each in a counterbalanced fashion separated by a 48-hour washout period. Treatment was taken nightly 2 hours before bedtime. Serious adverse events and side-effects were monitored. Melatonin supplementation significantly reduced global Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores relative to placebo, indicating improved sleep quality [melatonin 7.68 vs. placebo 9.47, original score units; difference -1.79; 95% confidence interval (CI), -2.70 to -0.88; p ≤ 0.0001]. Melatonin had no effect on sleep onset latency (melatonin 1.37 vs. placebo 1.42, log units; difference -0.05; 95% CI, -0.14 to 0.03; p = 0.23). With respect to the secondary outcomes, melatonin supplementation increased sleep efficiency on actigraphy, and vitality and mental health on the SF-36 v1 questionnaire (p ≤ 0.05 for each). Melatonin decreased anxiety on the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale and fatigue on the Fatigue Severity Scale (p ≤ 0.05 for both), but had no significant effect on daytime sleepiness on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (p = 0.15). No serious adverse events were reported. Melatonin supplementation over a 4-week period is effective and safe in improving subjective sleep quality as well as some aspects of objective sleep quality in patients with TBI. Identifier: 12611000734965; Prospectively registered on 13 July 2011.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 24 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 79 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 14%
Student > Bachelor 11 14%
Researcher 9 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 10%
Other 15 19%
Unknown 16 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 30%
Psychology 11 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 10%
Neuroscience 6 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 6%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 21 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 July 2018.
All research outputs
#869,356
of 13,272,830 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#718
of 2,117 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,210
of 347,821 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,272,830 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,117 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 34.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 347,821 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them