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The Genome of Chelonid Herpesvirus 5 Harbors Atypical Genes

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, October 2012
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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40 Dimensions

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55 Mendeley
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Title
The Genome of Chelonid Herpesvirus 5 Harbors Atypical Genes
Published in
PLOS ONE, October 2012
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0046623
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mathias Ackermann, Maxim Koriabine, Fabienne Hartmann-Fritsch, Pieter J. de Jong, Teresa D. Lewis, Nelli Schetle, Thierry M. Work, Julie Dagenais, George H. Balazs, Jo-Ann C. Leong

Abstract

The Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus (CFPHV; ChHV5) is believed to be the causative agent of fibropapillomatosis (FP), a neoplastic disease of marine turtles. While clinical signs and pathology of FP are well known, research on ChHV5 has been impeded because no cell culture system for its propagation exists. We have cloned a BAC containing ChHV5 in pTARBAC2.1 and determined its nucleotide sequence. Accordingly, ChHV5 has a type D genome and its predominant gene order is typical for the varicellovirus genus within the alphaherpesvirinae. However, at least four genes that are atypical for an alphaherpesvirus genome were also detected, i.e. two members of the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily (F-lec1, F-lec2), an orthologue to the mouse cytomegalovirus M04 (F-M04) and a viral sialyltransferase (F-sial). Four lines of evidence suggest that these atypical genes are truly part of the ChHV5 genome: (1) the pTARBAC insertion interrupted the UL52 ORF, leaving parts of the gene to either side of the insertion and suggesting that an intact molecule had been cloned. (2) Using FP-associated UL52 (F-UL52) as an anchor and the BAC-derived sequences as a means to generate primers, overlapping PCR was performed with tumor-derived DNA as template, which confirmed the presence of the same stretch of "atypical" DNA in independent FP cases. (3) Pyrosequencing of DNA from independent tumors did not reveal previously undetected viral sequences, suggesting that no apparent loss of viral sequence had happened due to the cloning strategy. (4) The simultaneous presence of previously known ChHV5 sequences and F-sial as well as F-M04 sequences was also confirmed in geographically distinct Australian cases of FP. Finally, transcripts of F-sial and F-M04 but not transcripts of lytic viral genes were detected in tumors from Hawaiian FP-cases. Therefore, we suggest that F-sial and F-M04 may play a role in FP pathogenesis.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 3 5%
Costa Rica 1 2%
Portugal 1 2%
Mexico 1 2%
Argentina 1 2%
Unknown 48 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 20%
Researcher 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 10 18%
Unknown 6 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 40%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 7 13%
Environmental Science 7 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 7%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 7 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 March 2014.
All research outputs
#3,575,799
of 12,369,000 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#48,674
of 135,721 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,457
of 266,301 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#852
of 2,250 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,369,000 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 135,721 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,301 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,250 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.