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The effect of isolation, fragmentation, and population bottlenecks on song structure of a Hawaiian honeycreeper

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology and Evolution, January 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

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13 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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39 Mendeley
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Title
The effect of isolation, fragmentation, and population bottlenecks on song structure of a Hawaiian honeycreeper
Published in
Ecology and Evolution, January 2018
DOI 10.1002/ece3.3820
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pang‐Ching, Joshua M., Paxton, Kristina L., Paxton, Eben H., Pack, Adam A., Hart, Patrick J.

Abstract

Little is known about how important social behaviors such as song vary within and among populations for any of the endemic Hawaiian honeycreepers. Habitat loss and non-native diseases (e.g., avian malaria) have resulted in isolation and fragmentation of Hawaiian honeycreepers within primarily high elevation forests. In this study, we examined how isolation of Hawai'i 'amakihi (Chlorodrepanis virens) populations within a fragmented landscape influences acoustic variability in song. In the last decade, small, isolated populations of disease tolerant 'amakihi have been found within low elevation forests, allowing us to record 'amakihi songs across a large elevational gradient (10-1800 m) that parallels disease susceptibility on Hawai'i island. To understand underlying differences among populations, we examined the role of geographic distance, elevation, and habitat structure on acoustic characteristics of 'amakihi songs. We found that the acoustic characteristics of 'amakihi songs and song-type repertoires varied most strongly across an elevational gradient. Differences in 'amakihi song types were primarily driven by less complex songs (e.g., fewer frequency changes, shorter songs) of individuals recorded at low elevation sites compared to mid and high elevation populations. The reduced complexity of 'amakihi songs at low elevation sites is most likely shaped by the effects of habitat fragmentation and a disease-driven population bottleneck associated with avian malaria, and maintained through isolation, localized song learning and sharing, and cultural drift. These results highlight how a non-native disease through its influence on population demographics may have also indirectly played a role in shaping the acoustic characteristics of a species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 26%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Unspecified 2 5%
Other 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 54%
Environmental Science 7 18%
Unspecified 5 13%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 5%
Linguistics 1 3%
Other 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 February 2018.
All research outputs
#1,874,367
of 12,559,973 outputs
Outputs from Ecology and Evolution
#1,013
of 3,535 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,804
of 343,584 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology and Evolution
#66
of 230 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,559,973 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,535 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 343,584 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 230 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.