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Mild prenatal hypoxia-ischemia leads to social deficits and central and peripheral inflammation in exposed offspring

Overview of attention for article published in Brain, Behavior & Immunity, March 2018
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3 tweeters

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25 Dimensions

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88 Mendeley
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Title
Mild prenatal hypoxia-ischemia leads to social deficits and central and peripheral inflammation in exposed offspring
Published in
Brain, Behavior & Immunity, March 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.bbi.2018.01.001
Pubmed ID
Authors

David J.O.' Driscoll, Valeria D. Felice, Louise C. Kenny, Geraldine B. Boylan, Gerard W. O'Keeffe

Abstract

Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) resulting from intrauterine or perinatal hypoxic-ischemia (HI) is a leading cause of long-term neonatal neurodisability. While most studies of long-term outcome have focused on moderate and severe HIE in term infants, recent work has shown that those with mild HIE may have subtle neurological impairments. However, the impact of mild HI on pre-term infants is much less clear given that pre-term birth is itself a risk factor for neurodisability. Here we show that mild HI insult alters behaviour, inflammation and the corticosterone stress response in a rat model of pre-term HIE. Mild HI exposure led to social deficits in exposed offspring at postnatal day 30, without impairments in the novel object recognition test nor in the open field test. This was also accompanied by elevations in circulating adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone indicating an exaggerated stress response. There were also elevations in il-1β and il-6 but not tnf-α mRNA and protein in the brain and blood samples. In summary we find that a mild HI exposure leads to social deficits, central and peripheral inflammation, and an abnormal corticosterone response which are three core features of autism spectrum disorder. This shows that mild HI exposure may be a risk factor for an abnormal neurodevelopmental outcome in pre-term offspring.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 88 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 16%
Student > Bachelor 13 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 15%
Researcher 7 8%
Other 6 7%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 22 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 19 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 16%
Psychology 13 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 3%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 26 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2019.
All research outputs
#8,915,987
of 14,714,661 outputs
Outputs from Brain, Behavior & Immunity
#1,406
of 2,217 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#190,326
of 359,404 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brain, Behavior & Immunity
#53
of 90 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,714,661 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,217 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.3. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 359,404 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 90 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.