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Effect of increasing the price of sugar-sweetened beverages on alcoholic beverage purchases: an economic analysis of sales data

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health (1978), January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#45 of 3,434)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
293 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
70 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Effect of increasing the price of sugar-sweetened beverages on alcoholic beverage purchases: an economic analysis of sales data
Published in
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health (1978), January 2018
DOI 10.1136/jech-2017-209791
Pubmed ID
Authors

Diana Quirmbach, Laura Cornelsen, Susan A Jebb, Theresa Marteau, Richard Smith

Abstract

Taxing soft-drinks may reduce their purchase, but assessing the impact on health demands wider consideration on alternative beverage choices. Effects on alcoholic drinks are of particular concern, as many contain similar or greater amounts of sugar than soft-drinks and have additional health harms. Changes in consumption of alcoholic drinks may reinforce or negate the intended effect of price changes for soft-drinks. A partial demand model, adapted from the Almost Ideal Demand System, was applied to Kantar WorldPanel data from 31 919 households from January 2012 to December 2013, covering drink purchases for home consumption, providing ~6 million purchases aggregated into 11 groups, including three levels of soft-drink, three of other non-alcoholic drinks and five of alcoholic drinks. An increase in the price of high-sugar drinks leads to an increase in the purchase of lager, an increase in the price of medium-sugar drinks reduces purchases of alcoholic drinks, while an increase in the price of diet/low-sugar drinks increases purchases of beer, cider and wines. Overall, the effects of price rises are greatest in the low-income group. Increasing the price of soft-drinks may change purchase patterns for alcohol. Increasing the price of medium-sugar drinks has the potential to have a multiplier-effect beneficial to health through reducing alcohol purchases, with the converse for increases in the price of diet-drinks. Although the reasons for such associations cannot be explained from this analysis, requiring further study, the design of fiscal interventions should now consider these wider potential outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 293 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 70 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 23%
Unspecified 13 19%
Researcher 13 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Other 12 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 29%
Unspecified 16 23%
Social Sciences 9 13%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 8 11%
Business, Management and Accounting 6 9%
Other 11 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 256. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 October 2019.
All research outputs
#50,004
of 13,757,653 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health (1978)
#45
of 3,434 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,543
of 352,550 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health (1978)
#3
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,757,653 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,434 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 352,550 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.