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Chiropractic student choices in relation to indications, non-indications and contra-indications of continued care

Overview of attention for article published in Chiropractic & Manual Therapies, January 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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16 Mendeley
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Title
Chiropractic student choices in relation to indications, non-indications and contra-indications of continued care
Published in
Chiropractic & Manual Therapies, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12998-017-0170-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stanley I. Innes, Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde, Bruce F. Walker

Abstract

The quality of health care provider clinical decisions has long been recognized as variable. Research has focused on clinical decision making with the aim of improving patient outcomes. No studies have looked at chiropractic students´ abilities in this regard. In 2016, advanced students from two Australian chiropractic programs (N = 444) answered a questionnaire on patient case scenarios for neck and low back pain (LBP). We selected 7 scenarios representing the three categories; continuing care, non-indicated care, and contraindicated care. This represented a total of 21 tested scores. Comparisons of correct answers were made a) for program years 3, 4 and 5, and b) between the three categories of care. In almost 1/3 of scenarios, correct scores were 70% or greater. Best results were for two neck pain cases (simple and with spinal cord involvement). Continued care showed most improvements with study year. However, the scenarios that reflected non-indication for continued care had much worse results and did not improve in higher years. For the obvious contraindicated neck scenario, the results were good from the beginning and progressively improved and for a contraindicated LBP scenario the results started poorly in year 3 but improved over the program years. Although student responses were generally good, there is still room for improvement, especially for non-indicated care. The quality of students' clinical decisions can be measured and thus has the potential to be used by chiropractic educators and regulatory bodies to identify student's in need of assistance as well as to monitor chiropractic programs in relation to student competence. Not applicable.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 31%
Other 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Student > Master 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Other 4 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 7 44%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 19%
Philosophy 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 August 2018.
All research outputs
#2,146,139
of 13,337,884 outputs
Outputs from Chiropractic & Manual Therapies
#155
of 347 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,864
of 347,821 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Chiropractic & Manual Therapies
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,337,884 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 347 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 347,821 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them