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Molecular and morphological analysis of the critically endangered Fijian iguanas reveals cryptic diversity and a complex biogeographic history

Overview of attention for article published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, September 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
8 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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30 Dimensions

Readers on

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138 Mendeley
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Title
Molecular and morphological analysis of the critically endangered Fijian iguanas reveals cryptic diversity and a complex biogeographic history
Published in
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, September 2008
DOI 10.1098/rstb.2008.0120
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. Scott Keogh, Danielle L Edwards, Robert N Fisher, Peter S Harlow

Abstract

The Pacific iguanas of the Fijian and Tongan archipelagos are a biogeographic enigma in that their closest relatives are found only in the New World. They currently comprise two genera and four species of extinct and extant taxa. The two extant species, Brachylophus fasciatus from Fiji, Tonga, and Vanuatu and Brachylophus vitiensis from western Fiji, are of considerable conservation concern with B. vitiensis listed as critically endangered. A recent molecular study has shown that Brachylophus comprised three evolutionarily significant units. To test these conclusions and to reevaluate the phylogenetic and biogeographic relationships within Brachylophus, we generated an mtDNA dataset consisting of 1462 base pairs for 61 individuals from 13 islands, representing both Brachylophus species. Unweighted parsimony analyses and Bayesian analyses produced a well-resolved phylogenetic hypothesis supported by high bootstrap values and posterior probabilities within Brachylophus. Our data reject the monophyly of specimens previously believed to comprise B. fasciatus. Instead, our data demonstrate that living Brachylophus comprise three robust and well-supported clades that do not correspond to current taxonomy. One of these clades comprises B. fasciatus from the Lau group of Fiji and Tonga (type locality for B. fasciatus), while a second comprises putative B. fasciatus from the central regions of Fiji, which we refer to here as B. n. sp. Animals in this clade form the sister group to B. vitiensis rather than other B. fasciatus. We herein describe this clade as a new species of Brachylophus based on molecular and morphological data. With only one exception, every island is home to one or more unique haplotypes. We discuss alternative biogeographic hypotheses to explain their distribution in the Pacific and the difficulties of distinguishing these. Together, our molecular and taxonomic results have important implications for future conservation initiatives for the Pacific iguanas.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 138 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 11 8%
United States 4 3%
United Kingdom 3 2%
India 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Uruguay 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Romania 1 <1%
Other 2 1%
Unknown 112 81%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 28 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 17%
Student > Bachelor 19 14%
Student > Master 18 13%
Other 13 9%
Other 31 22%
Unknown 5 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 107 78%
Environmental Science 13 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 April 2021.
All research outputs
#3,416,277
of 17,608,563 outputs
Outputs from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#2,440
of 5,534 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,184
of 296,697 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#40
of 85 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,608,563 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,534 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 296,697 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 85 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.