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Factors controlling nutrient availability to the developing fetus in ruminants

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, April 2015
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Title
Factors controlling nutrient availability to the developing fetus in ruminants
Published in
Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40104-015-0012-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kathrin A Dunlap, Jacob D Brown, Ashley B Keith, M Carey Satterfield

Abstract

Inadequate delivery of nutrients results in intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), which is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality in livestock. In ruminants, inadequate nutrition during pregnancy is often prevalent due to frequent utilization of exensive forage based grazing systems, making them highly susceptible to changes in nutrient quality and availability. Delivery of nutrients to the fetus is dependent on a number of critical factors including placental growth and development, utero-placental blood flow, nutrient availability, and placental metabolism and transport capacity. Previous findings from our laboratory and others, highlight essential roles for amino acids and their metabolites in supporting normal fetal growth and development, as well as the critical role for amino acid transporters in nutrient delivery to the fetus. The focus of this review will be on the role of maternal nutrition on placental form and function as a regulator of fetal development in ruminants.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 55 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 18%
Researcher 4 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 7%
Professor 4 7%
Other 11 19%
Unknown 10 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 40%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 7 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Unspecified 1 2%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 14 25%