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Determinants of antiretroviral adherence among HIV positive children and teenagers in rural Tanzania: a mixed methods study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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148 Mendeley
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Title
Determinants of antiretroviral adherence among HIV positive children and teenagers in rural Tanzania: a mixed methods study
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-0753-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel Nyogea, Sally Mtenga, Lars Henning, Fabian C Franzeck, Tracy R Glass, Emilio Letang, Marcel Tanner, Eveline Geubbels

Abstract

BackgroundAround 3.3 million children worldwide are infected with HIV and 90% of them live in sub-Saharan Africa. Our study aimed to estimate adherence levels and find the determinants, facilitators and barriers of ART adherence among children and teenagers in rural Tanzania.MethodsWe applied a sequential explanatory mixed method design targeting children and teenagers aged 2¿19 years residing in Ifakara. We conducted a quantitative cross sectional study followed by a qualitative study combining focus group discussions (FGDs) and in-depth interviews (IDIs). We used pill count to measure adherence and defined optimal adherence as¿>¿=80% of pills being taken. We analysed determinants of poor adherence using logistic regression. We held eight FGDs with adolescent boys and girls on ART and with caretakers. We further explored issues emerging in the FGDs in four in-depth interviews with patients and health workers. Qualitative data was analysed using thematic content analysis.ResultsOut of 116 participants available for quantitative analysis, 70% had optimal adherence levels and the average adherence level was 84%. Living with a non-parent caretaker predicted poor adherence status. From the qualitative component, unfavorable school environment, timing of the morning ART dose, treatment longevity, being unaware of HIV status, non-parental (biological) care, preference for traditional medicine (herbs) and forgetfulness were seen to be barriers for optimal adherence.ConclusionThe study has highlighted specific challenges in ART adherence faced by children and teenagers. Having a biological parent as a caretaker remains a key determinant of adherence among children and teenagers. To achieve optimal adherence, strategies targeting the caretakers, the school environment, and the health system need to be designed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 148 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Tanzania, United Republic of 3 2%
Unknown 145 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 40 27%
Unspecified 19 13%
Researcher 18 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 11%
Student > Bachelor 12 8%
Other 42 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 50 34%
Social Sciences 24 16%
Unspecified 23 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 21 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 6%
Other 21 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 October 2015.
All research outputs
#2,186,845
of 6,241,899 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#953
of 3,008 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#64,699
of 191,124 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#39
of 151 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,241,899 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 64th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,008 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 191,124 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 151 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.