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CHLAMYDIA PSITTACI IN FERAL ROSY-FACED LOVEBIRDS ( AGAPORNIS ROSEICOLLIS ) AND OTHER BACKYARD BIRDS IN MARICOPA COUNTY, ARIZONA, USA

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Wildlife Diseases, April 2018
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Title
CHLAMYDIA PSITTACI IN FERAL ROSY-FACED LOVEBIRDS ( AGAPORNIS ROSEICOLLIS ) AND OTHER BACKYARD BIRDS IN MARICOPA COUNTY, ARIZONA, USA
Published in
Journal of Wildlife Diseases, April 2018
DOI 10.7589/2017-06-145
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert J. Dusek, Anne Justice-Allen, Barbara Bodenstein, Susan Knowles, Daniel A. Grear, Laura Adams, Craig Levy, Hayley D. Yaglom, Valerie I. Shearn-Bochsler, Paula G. Ciembor, Christopher R. Gregory, Denise Pesti, Branson W. Ritchie

Abstract

  In 2013, a mortality event of nonnative, feral Rosy-faced Lovebirds ( Agapornis roseicollis) in residential backyards in Maricopa County, Arizona, USA was attributed to infection with Chlamydia psittaci. In June 2014, additional mortality occurred in the same region. Accordingly, in August 2014 we sampled live lovebirds and sympatric bird species visiting backyard bird feeders to determine the prevalence of DNA and the seroprevalence of antibodies to C. psittaci using real-time PCR-based testing and elementary body agglutination, respectively. Chlamydia psittaci DNA was present in conjunctival-choanal or cloacal swabs in 93% (43/46) of lovebirds and 10% (14/142) of sympatric birds. Antibodies to C. psittaci were detected in 76% (31/41) of lovebirds and 7% (7/102) of sympatric birds. Among the sympatric birds, Rock Doves ( Columba livia) had the highest prevalence of C. psittaci DNA (75%; 6/8) and seroprevalence (25%; 2/8). Psittacine circovirus 1 DNA was also identified, using real-time PCR-based testing from the same swab samples in 69% (11/16) of species sampled, with a prevalence of 80% (37/46) in lovebirds and 27% (38/142) in sympatric species. The presence of either Rosy-faced Lovebirds or Rock Doves at residential bird feeders may be cause for concern for epizootic and zoonotic transmission of C. psittaci in this region.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 3 20%
Student > Postgraduate 3 20%
Student > Master 3 20%
Researcher 2 13%
Unspecified 2 13%
Other 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 33%
Unspecified 4 27%
Environmental Science 2 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 7%
Other 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 January 2018.
All research outputs
#11,186,410
of 12,571,426 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#534
of 534 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#291,676
of 343,832 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#20
of 25 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 534 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.