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The apelin receptor influences biomechanical and morphological properties of endothelial cells

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Cellular Physiology, February 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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17 Mendeley
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Title
The apelin receptor influences biomechanical and morphological properties of endothelial cells
Published in
Journal of Cellular Physiology, February 2018
DOI 10.1002/jcp.26496
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anne Strohbach, Malte Pennewitz, Michael Glaubitz, Raghavendra Palankar, Stefan Groß, Florian Lorenz, Ilka Materzok, Alena Rong, Mathias C. Busch, Stephan B. Felix, Mihaela Delcea, Raila Busch

Abstract

The adaption of endothelial cells to local flow conditions is a multifunctional process which leads to distinct alterations in cell shape, the subcellular distribution of structural proteins, and cellular function. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified to be fundamentally involved in such processes. Recently, we and others have shown that the expression of the endothelial GPCR apelin receptor (APJ) is regulated by fluid flow and that activation of APJ participates in signaling pathways which are related to processes of mechanotransduction. The present study aims to illuminate these findings by further visualization of APJ function. We show that APJ is located to the cellular junctions and might thus be associated with platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Furthermore, siRNA-mediated silencing of APJ expression influences the shear-induced adaption of HUVEC in terms of cytoskeletal remodeling, cellular elasticity, cellular motility, attachment, and distribution of adhesion complexes. Taken together, our results demonstrate that APJ is crucial for complemented endothelial adaption to local flow conditions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 24%
Researcher 4 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 18%
Other 2 12%
Unknown 4 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 18%
Engineering 2 12%
Neuroscience 1 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 January 2018.
All research outputs
#7,800,921
of 12,433,783 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Cellular Physiology
#2,594
of 4,146 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#193,618
of 341,612 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Cellular Physiology
#47
of 121 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,433,783 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,146 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 341,612 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 121 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.