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Intrinsic and Extrinsic Thymic Adrenergic Networks: Sex Steroid-Dependent Plasticity

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in endocrinology, January 2018
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Title
Intrinsic and Extrinsic Thymic Adrenergic Networks: Sex Steroid-Dependent Plasticity
Published in
Frontiers in endocrinology, January 2018
DOI 10.3389/fendo.2018.00013
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gordana Momčilo Leposavić, Ivan M. Pilipović

Abstract

The thymus is sexually differentiated organ providing microenvironment for T-cell precursor differentiation/maturation in the major histocompatibility complex-restricted self-tolerant T cells. With increasing age, the thymus undergoes involution leading to the decline in efficacy of thymopoiesis. Noradrenaline from thymic nerve fibers and "(nor)adrenergic" cells is involved in the regulation of thymopoiesis. In rodents, noradrenaline concentration in thymus and adrenoceptor (AR) expression on thymic cells depend on sex and age. These differences are suggested to be implicated in the development of sexual diergism and the age-related decline in thymopoiesis. The programming of both thymic sexual differentiation and its involution occurs during the critical early perinatal period and may be reprogrammed during peripubertal development. The thymic (re)programming is critically dependent on circulating levels of gonadal steroids. Although the underlying molecular mechanisms have not yet been elucidated fully, it is assumed that the gonadal steroid action during the critical perinatal/peripubertal developmental periods leads to long-lasting changes in the efficacy of thymopoiesis partly through (re)programming of "(nor)adrenergic" cell networks and AR expression on thymic cells.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 21%
Student > Master 2 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 14%
Researcher 2 14%
Professor 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 3 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 3 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 14%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Other 2 14%
Unknown 4 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 January 2018.
All research outputs
#11,058,094
of 12,439,436 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in endocrinology
#1,507
of 2,164 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#288,418
of 341,197 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in endocrinology
#109
of 170 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,439,436 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,164 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 170 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.