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Recurrent Melioidosis in Patients in Northeast Thailand Is Frequently Due to Reinfection Rather than Relapse

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Clinical Microbiology, December 2005
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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71 Dimensions

Readers on

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67 Mendeley
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Title
Recurrent Melioidosis in Patients in Northeast Thailand Is Frequently Due to Reinfection Rather than Relapse
Published in
Journal of Clinical Microbiology, December 2005
DOI 10.1128/jcm.43.12.6032-6034.2005
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bina Maharjan, Narisara Chantratita, Mongkol Vesaratchavest, Allen Cheng, Vanaporn Wuthiekanun, Wirongrong Chierakul, Wipada Chaowagul, Nicholas P. J. Day, Sharon J. Peacock

Abstract

Human melioidosis is associated with a high rate of recurrent disease, despite adequate antimicrobial treatment. Here, we define the rate of relapse versus the rate of reinfection in 116 patients with 123 episodes of recurrent melioidosis who were treated at Sappasithiprasong Hospital in Northeast Thailand between 1986 and 2005. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was performed on all isolates; isolates from primary and recurrent disease for a given patient different by one or more bands were examined by a sequence-based approach based on multilocus sequence typing. Overall, 92 episodes (75%) of recurrent disease were caused by the same strain (relapse) and 31 episodes (25%) were due to infection with a new strain (reinfection). The interval to recurrence differed between patients with relapse and reinfection; those with relapses had a median time to relapse of 228 days (range, 15 to 3,757 days; interquartile range [IQR], 99.5 to 608 days), while those with reinfection had a median time to reinfection of 823 days (range, 17 to 2,931 days; IQR, 453 to 1,211 days) (P = 0.0001). A total of 64 episodes (52%) occurred within 12 months of the primary infection. Relapse was responsible for 57 of 64 (89%) episodes of recurrent infection within the first year after primary disease, whereas relapse was responsible for 35 of 59 (59%) episodes after 1 year (P < 0.0001). Our data indicate that in this setting of endemicity, reinfection is responsible for one-quarter of recurrent cases. This finding has important implications for the clinical management of melioidosis patients and for antibiotic treatment studies that use recurrent disease as a marker for treatment failure.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Malaysia 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Thailand 1 1%
Unknown 62 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 19%
Student > Master 12 18%
Student > Bachelor 9 13%
Researcher 7 10%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Other 15 22%
Unknown 6 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 34%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 19%
Immunology and Microbiology 10 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 3%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 7 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 January 2017.
All research outputs
#5,815,546
of 17,859,820 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Clinical Microbiology
#4,743
of 11,697 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,059
of 298,097 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Clinical Microbiology
#41
of 108 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,859,820 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,697 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,097 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 108 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.