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Spatial memory is as important as weapon and body size for territorial ownership in a lekking hummingbird

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
26 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
53 Mendeley
Title
Spatial memory is as important as weapon and body size for territorial ownership in a lekking hummingbird
Published in
Scientific Reports, January 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-20441-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marcelo Araya-Salas, Paulina Gonzalez-Gomez, Katarzyna Wojczulanis-Jakubas, Virgilio López, Timothy F. Wright

Abstract

Advanced cognitive abilities have long been hypothesized to be important in mating. Yet, most work on sexual selection has focused on morphological traits and its relevance for cognitive evolution is poorly understood. We studied the spatial memory of lekking long-billed hermits (Phaethornis longirostris) and evaluated its role in lek territory ownership, the magnitude of its effect compared to phenotypic traits expected to influence sexual selection, and whether its variation is indicated in the structure of mating vocal signal. Spatial memory (the ability to recall the position of a rewarding feeder) was compared between "territorial" and "floater" males. Interestingly, although spatial memory and body size both positively affected the probability of lek territory ownership, our results suggest a stronger effect of spatial memory. Bill tip length (used as weapon in agonistic interactions) also showed a positive but smaller effect. Load lifting during vertical flight, a measure of physical performance relevant to agonistic interactions, had no effect on territory ownership. Finally, both body size and spatial memory were indicated in the structure of male song: body size negatively correlated with song lowest frequency, while spatial memory positively predicted song consistency. Together, our findings lend support for cognition as a sexual selection target.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 26 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 53 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 25%
Researcher 12 23%
Student > Bachelor 9 17%
Student > Master 9 17%
Student > Postgraduate 2 4%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 4 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 47%
Environmental Science 5 9%
Unspecified 5 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 9 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 66. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 August 2019.
All research outputs
#292,228
of 14,389,463 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#3,590
of 74,206 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,211
of 359,224 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#1
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,389,463 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 74,206 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 359,224 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.