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Oxidative and nitrosative stress pathways in the brain of socially isolated adult male rats demonstrating depressive- and anxiety-like symptoms

Overview of attention for article published in Brain Structure & Function, March 2016
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Title
Oxidative and nitrosative stress pathways in the brain of socially isolated adult male rats demonstrating depressive- and anxiety-like symptoms
Published in
Brain Structure & Function, March 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00429-016-1218-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dragana Filipović, Nevena Todorović, Rick E. Bernardi, Peter Gass

Abstract

Various stressors may disrupt the redox homeostasis of an organism by causing oxidative and nitrosative stress that may activate stressor-specific pathways and provoke specific responses. Chronic social isolation (CSIS) represents a mild chronic stress that evokes a variety of neurobehavioral changes in rats similar to those observed in people with psychiatric disorders, including depression. Most rodent studies have focused on the effect of social isolation during weaning or adolescence, while its effect in adult rats has not been extensively examined. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge regarding the involvement of oxidative/nitrosative stress pathways in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of adult male rats exposed to CSIS, focusing on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity, behavior parameters, antioxidative defense systems, stress signaling mediated by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and mitochondria-related proapoptotic signaling. Although increased concentrations of corticosterone (CORT) have been shown to induce oxidative and nitrosative stress, we suggest a mechanism underlying the glucocorticoid paradox whereby a state of oxidative/nitrosative stress may exist under basal CORT levels. This review also highlights the differential susceptibility of prefrontal cortex and hippocampus to oxidative stress following CSIS and suggests a possible cellular pathway of stress tolerance that preserves the hippocampus from molecular damage and apoptosis. The differential regulation of the transcriptional factor NF-κB, and the enzymes inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) following CSIS may be one functional difference between the response of the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, thus identifying potentially relevant targets for antidepressant treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 110 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 110 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 18%
Researcher 11 10%
Student > Bachelor 10 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 5%
Other 22 20%
Unknown 18 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 23 21%
Arts and Humanities 13 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 7%
Psychology 8 7%
Other 25 23%
Unknown 24 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 February 2018.
All research outputs
#7,815,990
of 12,455,224 outputs
Outputs from Brain Structure & Function
#500
of 913 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#192,260
of 339,368 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brain Structure & Function
#21
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,455,224 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 913 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 339,368 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.