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High prevalence of malaria in a non-endemic setting: comparison of diagnostic tools and patient outcome during a four-year survey (2013–2017)

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, February 2018
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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20 Mendeley
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Title
High prevalence of malaria in a non-endemic setting: comparison of diagnostic tools and patient outcome during a four-year survey (2013–2017)
Published in
Malaria Journal, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2218-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adriana Calderaro, Giovanna Piccolo, Sara Montecchini, Mirko Buttrini, Sabina Rossi, Maria Loretana Dell’Anna, Valeria De Remigis, Maria Cristina Arcangeletti, Carlo Chezzi, Flora De Conto

Abstract

Malaria is no longer endemic in Italy since 1970 when the World Health Organization declared Italy malaria-free, but it is now the most commonly imported disease. The aim of the study was to analyse the trend of imported malaria cases in Parma, Italy, during January 2013-June 2017, reporting also the treatment and the outcome of cases, exploring the comparison of the three diagnostic tests used for malaria diagnosis: microscopy, immunochromatographic assay (ICT) (BinaxNOW®) and Real-time PCR assays detecting Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium malariae, Plasmodium ovale curtisi, Plasmodium ovale wallikeri, and Plasmodium knowlesi. Of the 288 patients with suspected malaria, 87 were positive by microscopy: 73 P. falciparum, 2 P. vivax, 8 P. ovale, 1 P. vivax/P. ovale, 1 P. malariae and 2 Plasmodium sp. All samples were positive by ICT except 6. Plasmodial DNA was revealed in the 87 cases and in 2 additional cases showing P. falciparum-specific bands by ICT, as follows: 75 P. falciparum, 2 P. vivax, 6 P. ovale curtisi, 3 P. ovale wallikeri, 1 P. malariae, and 2 mixed infections. 72 patients were foreigners and 17 Italians travelling for tourism or business. The majority of these patients presented with fever at blood collection and did not have chemoprophylaxis. No fatal cases were observed and the drug mostly used was quinine observing a negative blood smear or a parasitaemia < 0.001% after 48-72 h' therapy. The study shows an update and a thorough analysis of imported malaria cases in the area of Parma during 4.5 years from the point of view of the total case management, clinical and diagnostic. The prevalence of malaria in such area in the considered period was especially due to immigrants mostly from Africa. Molecular methods were more sensitive and specific than microscopy and ICT, both detecting additional cases of P. falciparum malaria missed by microscopy and correctly identifying the Plasmodium species of medical interest. The data reported in this study may stimulate the clinicians in non-endemic areas to suspect malaria also in cases, where the most typical symptoms are absent, and the parasitologists to confirm the results of microscopy, remaining the reference method, with molecular methods to avoid misdiagnosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 25%
Student > Bachelor 4 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 10%
Librarian 1 5%
Researcher 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 10%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 6 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 February 2018.
All research outputs
#7,520,240
of 12,470,921 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,563
of 3,649 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#178,736
of 339,645 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#64
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,470,921 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,649 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 339,645 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.