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Neuroprotective effects of voluntary running on cognitive dysfunction in an α-synuclein rat model of Parkinson's disease

Overview of attention for article published in Neurobiology of Aging, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
21 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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104 Mendeley
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Title
Neuroprotective effects of voluntary running on cognitive dysfunction in an α-synuclein rat model of Parkinson's disease
Published in
Neurobiology of Aging, May 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2018.01.011
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erin K. Crowley, Yvonne M. Nolan, Aideen M. Sullivan

Abstract

Parkinson's disease (PD) is no longer primarily classified as a motor disorder due to increasing recognition of the impact on patients of several nonmotor PD symptoms, including cognitive dysfunction. These nonmotor symptoms are highly prevalent and greatly affect the quality of life of patients with PD, and so, therapeutic interventions to alleviate these symptoms are urgently needed. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential neuroprotective effects of voluntary running on cognitive dysfunction in an adeno-associated virus-α-synuclein rat model of PD. Bilateral intranigral administration of adeno-associated virus-α-synuclein was found to induce motor dysfunction and a significant loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons, neither of which were rescued by voluntary running. Overexpression of α-synuclein also resulted in significant impairment on hippocampal neurogenesis-dependent pattern separation, a cognitive task; this was rescued by voluntary running. This was substantiated by an effect of running on neurogenesis levels in the dorsal dentate gyrus, suggesting that the functional effects of running on pattern separation were mediated via increased neurogenesis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 104 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 104 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 19 18%
Student > Master 11 11%
Researcher 6 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 5 5%
Other 19 18%
Unknown 38 37%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 20 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 7%
Unspecified 5 5%
Other 16 15%
Unknown 39 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2018.
All research outputs
#1,436,717
of 13,810,416 outputs
Outputs from Neurobiology of Aging
#514
of 3,249 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,228
of 355,235 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neurobiology of Aging
#7
of 67 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,810,416 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,249 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 355,235 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 67 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.