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The intestinal protist Blastocystis is not a common member of the healthy infant gut microbiota in a Westernized country (Ireland)

Overview of attention for article published in Parasitology, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
17 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
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Title
The intestinal protist Blastocystis is not a common member of the healthy infant gut microbiota in a Westernized country (Ireland)
Published in
Parasitology, February 2018
DOI 10.1017/s0031182018000033
Pubmed ID
Authors

P. D. Scanlan, C. J. Hill, R. P. Ross, C. A. Ryan, C. Stanton, P. D. Cotter

Abstract

Research into the gut microbiota of human infants is necessary in order to better understand how inter-species interactions and ecological succession shape the diversity of the gut microbiota, and in turn, how the specific composition of the gut microbiota impacts on host health both during infancy and in later years. Blastocystis is a ubiquitous intestinal protist that has been linked to a number of intestinal and extra-intestinal diseases. However, emerging data show that asymptomatic carriage is common and that Blastocystis is prevalent in the healthy adult gut microbiota. Nonetheless, little is known about the prevalence and diversity of this microorganism in the healthy infant gut, including when and how individuals become colonized by Blastocystis. Here, we surveyed the prevalence and diversity of Blastocystis in an infant population (n = 59) from an industrialized country (Ireland) using Blastocystis-specific primers at three or more time-points up to 24 months old. Only three infants were positive for Blastocystis (prevalence = 5%) and this was only noted for samples collected at month 24. This rate is comparatively low relative to previously reported prevalence rates in the contemporaneous adult population. These data suggest that infants in Westernized countries that are successfully colonized by Blastocystis most likely acquire this microorganism via horizontal transfer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 31%
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 19%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 12%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 8%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 4 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 October 2020.
All research outputs
#1,780,148
of 19,148,527 outputs
Outputs from Parasitology
#96
of 2,432 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,104
of 384,614 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasitology
#1
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,148,527 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,432 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 384,614 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.