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Effect of biliopancreatic diversion on sleep quality and daytime sleepiness in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Endocrinology and Metabolism, December 2017
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Title
Effect of biliopancreatic diversion on sleep quality and daytime sleepiness in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes
Published in
Archives of Endocrinology and Metabolism, December 2017
DOI 10.1590/2359-3997000000314
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mayra Mello, Ana Carolina J. Vasques, José C. Pareja, Maria da S. de Oliveira, Fernanda S. Novaes, Élinton A. Chaim, Bruno Geloneze

Abstract

The poor quality of sleep and the deprivation thereof have been associated with disruption of metabolic homeostasis, favoring the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We aimed to evaluate the influence of biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) surgery on sleep quality and excessive daytime sleepiness of obese patients with T2DM, comparing them with two control groups consisting of obese and normal weight individuals, both normal glucose tolerant. Forty-two women were divided into three groups: LeanControl (n = 11), ObeseControl (n = 13), and ObeseT2DM (n = 18). The LeanC and ObeseC groups underwent all tests and evaluations once. The ObeseT2DM underwent BPD and were reassessed after 12 months. Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were applied before and 12 months after BPD. Before surgery, there was less daytime sleepiness in LeanC group (p = 0.013) compared with ObeseC and T2DMObese groups. The two obese groups did not differ regarding daytime sleepiness, demonstrating that the presence of T2DM had no influence on daytime sleepiness. After surgery, the daytime sleepiness (p = 0.002) and the sleep quality (p = 0.033) improved. The score for daytime sleepiness of operated T2DMObese group became similar to LeanC and lower than ObeseC (p = 0.047). BPD surgery has positively influenced daytime sleepiness and sleep quality of obese patients with T2DM, leading to normalization of daytime sleepiness 12 months after surgery. These results reinforce previously identified associations between sleep, obesity and T2DM in view of the importance of sleep in metabolic homeostasis, quality of life and health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 29%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Researcher 3 13%
Other 1 4%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 7 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 21%
Psychology 5 21%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 8 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 February 2018.
All research outputs
#11,099,058
of 12,481,741 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Endocrinology and Metabolism
#46
of 63 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#288,251
of 340,435 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Endocrinology and Metabolism
#2
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,481,741 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 63 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 340,435 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
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