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Reduced arctic tundra productivity linked with landform and climate change interactions

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
73 Mendeley
Title
Reduced arctic tundra productivity linked with landform and climate change interactions
Published in
Scientific Reports, February 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-20692-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mark J. Lara, Ingmar Nitze, Guido Grosse, Philip Martin, A. David McGuire

Abstract

Arctic tundra ecosystems have experienced unprecedented change associated with climate warming over recent decades. Across the Pan-Arctic, vegetation productivity and surface greenness have trended positively over the period of satellite observation. However, since 2011 these trends have slowed considerably, showing signs of browning in many regions. It is unclear what factors are driving this change and which regions/landforms will be most sensitive to future browning. Here we provide evidence linking decadal patterns in arctic greening and browning with regional climate change and local permafrost-driven landscape heterogeneity. We analyzed the spatial variability of decadal-scale trends in surface greenness across the Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska (~60,000 km²) using the Landsat archive (1999-2014), in combination with novel 30 m classifications of polygonal tundra and regional watersheds, finding landscape heterogeneity and regional climate change to be the most important factors controlling historical greenness trends. Browning was linked to increased temperature and precipitation, with the exception of young landforms (developed following lake drainage), which will likely continue to green. Spatiotemporal model forecasting suggests carbon uptake potential to be reduced in response to warmer and/or wetter climatic conditions, potentially increasing the net loss of carbon to the atmosphere, at a greater degree than previously expected.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 73 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 15 21%
Student > Master 15 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 18%
Researcher 11 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Other 15 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 21 29%
Unspecified 19 26%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 15 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 3 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 September 2018.
All research outputs
#2,789,732
of 12,706,057 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#16,678
of 59,429 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,542
of 346,587 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#3
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,706,057 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 59,429 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,587 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.