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When the heart kills the liver: acute liver failure in congestive heart failure

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Medical Research, December 2009
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1 tweeter

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29 Mendeley
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Title
When the heart kills the liver: acute liver failure in congestive heart failure
Published in
European Journal of Medical Research, December 2009
DOI 10.1186/2047-783x-14-12-541
Pubmed ID
Authors

FH Saner, M Heuer, M Meyer, A Canbay, GC Sotiropoulos, A Radtke, J Treckmann, S Beckebaum, C Dohna-Schwake, SW Oldedamink, A Paul

Abstract

Congestive heart failure as a cause of acute liver failure is rarely documented with only a few cases. Although the pathophysiology is poorly understood, there is rising evidence, that low cardiac output with consecutive reduction in hepatic blood flow is a main causing factor, rather than hypotension. In the setting of acute liver failure due to congestive heart failure, clinical signs of the latter can be absent, which requires an appropriate diagnostic approach. As a reference center for acute liver failure and liver transplantation we recorded from May 2003 to December 2007 202 admissions with the primary diagnoses acute liver failure. 13/202 was due to congestive heart failure, which was associated with a mortality rate of 54%. Leading cause of death was the underlying heart failure. Asparagine transaminase (AST), bilirubin, and international normalized ratio (INR) did not differ significantly in surviving and deceased patients at admission. Despite both groups had signs of cardiogenic shock, the cardiac index (CI) was significantly higher in the survival group on admission as compared with non-survivors (2.1 L/min/m(2) vs. 1.6 L/min/m(2), p=0.04). Central venous - and pulmonary wedge pressure did not differ significantly. Remarkable improvement of liver function was recorded in the group, who recovered from cardiogenic shock. In conclusion, patients with acute liver failure require an appropriate diagnostic approach. Congestive heart failure should always be considered as a possible cause of acute liver failure.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 24%
Student > Master 5 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 14%
Professor 4 14%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 66%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 February 2018.
All research outputs
#7,839,134
of 12,492,926 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Medical Research
#117
of 235 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#194,916
of 344,453 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Medical Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,492,926 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 235 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,453 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them