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Increased expression of Hsp70 and Hsp90 mRNA as biomarkers of thermal stress in loggerhead turtle embryos (Caretta Caretta)

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Thermal Biology, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#38 of 414)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
52 Mendeley
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Title
Increased expression of Hsp70 and Hsp90 mRNA as biomarkers of thermal stress in loggerhead turtle embryos (Caretta Caretta)
Published in
Journal of Thermal Biology, January 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.jtherbio.2014.11.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

J.N. Tedeschi, W.J. Kennington, O. Berry, S. Whiting, M. Meekan, N.J. Mitchell

Abstract

The survival and viability of sea turtle embryos is dependent upon favourable nest temperatures throughout the incubation period. Consequently, future generations of sea turtles may be at risk from increasing nest temperatures due to climate change, but little is known about how embryos respond to heat stress. Heat shock genes are likely to be important in this process because they code for proteins that prevent cellular damage in response to environmental stressors. This study provides the first evidence of an expression response in the heat shock genes of embryos of loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) exposed to realistic and near-lethal temperatures (34°C and 36°C) for 1 or 3 hours. We investigated changes in Heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60), Hsp70, and Hsp90 mRNA in heart (n=24) and brain tissue (n=29) in response to heat stress. Under the most extreme treatment (36°C, 3h), Hsp70 increased mRNA expression by a factor of 38.8 in heart tissue and 15.7 in brain tissue, while Hsp90 mRNA expression increased by a factor of 98.3 in heart tissue and 14.7 in brain tissue. Hence, both Hsp70 and Hsp90 are useful biomarkers for assessing heat stress in the late-stage embryos of sea turtles. The method we developed can be used as a platform for future studies on variation in the thermotolerance response from the clutch to population scale, and can help us anticipate the resilience of reptile embryos to extreme heating events.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 50 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 31%
Student > Master 15 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Unspecified 4 8%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Other 8 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 37%
Environmental Science 13 25%
Unspecified 10 19%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 5 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 June 2017.
All research outputs
#1,179,786
of 11,720,764 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Thermal Biology
#38
of 414 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,657
of 255,571 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Thermal Biology
#1
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,720,764 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 414 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,571 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.