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Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents to induce regression and prevent the progression of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, February 2018
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9 tweeters

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7 Dimensions

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53 Mendeley
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Title
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents to induce regression and prevent the progression of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, February 2018
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd004121.pub4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shannon M Grabosch, Osman M Shariff, C. William Helm

Abstract

This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in 2014, Issue 4. Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) precedes the development of invasive carcinoma of the cervix. Current treatment of CIN is quite effective, but there is morbidity for the patient related to pain, bleeding, infection, cervical stenosis and premature birth in a subsequent pregnancy. Effective treatment with medications, rather than surgery, would be beneficial. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs), including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, to induce regression and prevent the progression of CIN. Previously, we searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2013, Issue 11), MEDLINE (November, 2013) and Embase (November week 48, 2013). An updated search was performed in August 2017 for CENTRAL (2017, Issue 8), MEDLINE (July, week 3, 2017) and Embase (July week 31, 2017). Trial registries and journals were also searched as part of the update. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or controlled trials of NSAIDs in the treatment of CIN. Three review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risks of bias in accordance with Cochrane methodology. Outcome data were pooled using fixed-effect meta-analyses. In three RCTs, 171 women over the age of 18 years were randomised to receive celecoxib 400 mg daily for 14 to 18 weeks versus placebo (one study, 130 participants), celecoxib 200 mg twice daily by mouth for six months versus placebo (one study, 25 participants), or rofecoxib 25 mg once daily by mouth for three months versus placebo (one study, 16 participants). The study with rofecoxib was discontinued when the medicine was withdrawn from the market in 2004. The trials ran from June 2005 to April 2012, June 2002 to October 2003, and May to October 2004, respectively. We have chosen to include the data from the rofecoxib study as outcomes may be similar when other such NSAIDs are utilised.Partial or complete regression of CIN 2 or CIN 3 occurred in 31 out of 70 (44%) in the treatment arms and 19 of 62 (31%) in the placebo arms (risk ratio (RR) 1.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93 to 2.27; P value 0.10), three studies, 132 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). Complete regression of CIN 2 or CIN 3 occurred in 15 of 62 (24%) of those receiving celecoxib versus 10 of 54 (19%) of those receiving placebo (RR 1.31, 95% CI 0.65 to 2.67; P value 0.45, two studies, 116 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). Partial regression of CIN 2 or CIN 3 occurred in 14 of 62 (23%) of those receiving celecoxib versus 8 of 54 (15%) of those receiving placebo (RR 1.56, 95% CI 0.72 to 3.4; P value 0.26), two studies, 116 participants; moderate-certainty evidence).Progression to a higher grade of CIN, but not to invasive cancer, occurred in one of 12 (8%) of those receiving celecoxib and two of 13 (15%) receiving placebo (RR 0.54, 95% CI 0.05 to 5.24; P value 0.60, one study, 25 participants; very low-certainty evidence). Two studies reported no cases of progression to invasive cancer within the timeframe of the study. No toxicity was reported in the two original articles. The trial added in this update had one Grade 3 gastrointestinal adverse effect in the treatment arm, but otherwise had similar Grade 1 to 2 side effects between treatment and placebo groups. Although the studies were well-conducted and randomised, some risk of bias was detected in all studies. Furthermore, the duration of the studies was short, which may mask identifying progression to cancer.The addition of the trial in this update quadrupled the number of patients in the original review and was a well-designed multicentre trial thus, increasing the overall certainty of evidence from very low to moderate for this review. There are currently no convincing data to support a benefit for NSAIDs in the treatment of CIN. With the addition of this new, larger randomised trial we would rate this as overall moderate-certainty evidence by the GRADE criteria.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 53 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 28%
Unspecified 13 25%
Researcher 8 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Other 7 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 38%
Unspecified 14 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 13%
Social Sciences 4 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Other 6 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2018.
All research outputs
#3,157,946
of 12,544,629 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#6,122
of 10,351 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,056
of 347,182 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#135
of 203 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,544,629 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,351 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.2. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 347,182 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 203 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.