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The number needed to vaccinate (NNV) and population extensions of the NNV: comparison of influenza and pneumococcal vaccine programmes for people aged 65 years and over

Overview of attention for article published in Vaccine, June 2004
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
45 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
The number needed to vaccinate (NNV) and population extensions of the NNV: comparison of influenza and pneumococcal vaccine programmes for people aged 65 years and over
Published in
Vaccine, June 2004
DOI 10.1016/j.vaccine.2003.11.052
Pubmed ID
Authors

Heath Kelly, John Attia, Ross Andrews, Richard F. Heller

Abstract

The number needed to treat (NNT) and population extensions of the NNT describe the population outcomes of disease treatment, usually for chronic diseases. We have developed similar measures for vaccine preventable diseases based on the number needed to vaccinate. These measures quantify the number of people, or the number of vaccine doses, needed to prevent one event due to disease per year and allow the calculation of the vaccine cost to prevent one event due to disease per year. We used this method to compare influenza and pneumococcal vaccine programmes for people aged 65 years or more. We calculated the vaccine cost (dollars AUD) to prevent a case of disease, a hospitalisation or a death due to influenza or invasive pneumococcal disease each year in this age group. For influenza, the vaccine costs were dollars 598 to prevent one case per year, dollars 10787 per hospitalisation prevented and dollars 74801 per death prevented each year. We assumed all cases of invasive pneumococcal disease were hospitalised so the vaccine cost of dollars 11494 per case prevented was the same as the vaccine cost per hospitalisation prevented, while the vaccine cost per death prevented each year was dollars 49972. These results suggest the vaccine costs for the prevention of one hospitalisation or one death each year due to invasive pneumococcal disease among the elderly in Australia would be similar to the costs for the prevention of one hospitalisation or death due to influenza.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Denmark 1 3%
Unknown 37 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 28%
Student > Master 5 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 13%
Other 4 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Other 10 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 59%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 18%
Mathematics 3 8%
Unspecified 2 5%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 2 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 January 2009.
All research outputs
#3,517,621
of 12,269,624 outputs
Outputs from Vaccine
#4,110
of 10,554 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,231
of 267,500 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Vaccine
#48
of 164 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,269,624 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,554 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,500 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 164 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.