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Nonfasting Glucose and Incident Stroke and Its Types ― The Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS) ―

Overview of attention for article published in Circulation Journal, May 2018
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

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7 Mendeley
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Title
Nonfasting Glucose and Incident Stroke and Its Types ― The Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS) ―
Published in
Circulation Journal, May 2018
DOI 10.1253/circj.cj-17-0950
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hironori Imano, Hiroyasu Iso, Akihiko Kitamura, Kazumasa Yamagishi, Mina Hayama-Terada, Isao Muraki, Takeo Okada, Mitsumasa Umesawa, Tetsuya Ohira, Tomoko Sankai, Renzhe Cui, Takeshi Tanigawa, Masahiko Kiyama

Abstract

The effect of postprandial glucose on the risk of cardiovascular disease has been emphasized, but it is controversial whether nonfasting glucose is related to incident stroke and its types.Methods and Results:We investigated the associations of nonfasting glucose with incident stroke and its types among 7,198 participants aged 40-74 years from the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study, enrolled in 1995-2000. We estimated multivariable hazard ratios (HR) using Cox proportional hazard models. Over a median follow-up of 14.1 years, 291 cases of total stroke (ischemic strokes: 191 including 109 lacunar infarctions) were identified. Nonfasting glucose concentration was associated with greater risk of incident total stroke, ischemic stroke and lacunar infarction when modeled categorically (for prediabetic type: 7.8-11.0 mmol/L vs. normal type: <7.8 mmol/L among all subjects, HR for lacunar infarction was 2.02, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.19, 3.43) or continuously (per one standard deviation increment among all subjects, HR for lacunar infarction was 1.29, 95% CI: 1.15, 1.45). Diabetic type showed similar results. Population attributable fractions of nonfasting hyperglycemia were 13.2% for ischemic stroke and 17.4% for lacunar infarction. Nonfasting glucose concentration, either as a diagnosis of prediabetic and diabetic types or as a continuous variable, proved to be an independent predictor significantly attributed to incident total stroke, especially ischemic stroke and lacunar infarction, in the general population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 2 29%
Student > Postgraduate 1 14%
Student > Master 1 14%
Researcher 1 14%
Lecturer 1 14%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 57%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 14%
Unknown 1 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 February 2018.
All research outputs
#10,011,990
of 12,510,237 outputs
Outputs from Circulation Journal
#718
of 1,351 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#250,353
of 345,634 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Circulation Journal
#54
of 126 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,510,237 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,351 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 345,634 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 126 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.