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Natural progress of D-dimer following total joint arthroplasty: a baseline for the diagnosis of the early postoperative infection

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, February 2018
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Title
Natural progress of D-dimer following total joint arthroplasty: a baseline for the diagnosis of the early postoperative infection
Published in
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13018-018-0730-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yong Seuk Lee, Young-Kyun Lee, Seung Bum Han, Chang Hyun Nam, Javad Parvizi, Kyung-Hoi Koo

Abstract

Early detection followed by prompt intervention is essential for the treatment of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). D-dimer, a fibrin degradation product, characteristically changes rapidly during early postoperative period and has a short half-life. The aim of this prospective study was to measure postoperative change of D-dimer level after joint arthroplasty in conjunction with ESR and CRP. ESR, CRP, and D-dimer levels were measured on the day before surgery, postoperative days 1, 2, 3, and 5 and weeks 2 and 6 in 65 patients who underwent elective primary total hip arthroplasty (38 hips in 38 patients) or total knee arthroplasty (27 knees in 27 patients). We compared perioperative changes of the three biomarkers. ESR level was elevated from postoperative day 1 and reached a peak level of 45 mm/h at postoperative day 5. The elevation persisted until postoperative week 6. CRP level was elevated from postoperative day 1 and reached a peak level of 10 mg/dl between postoperative day 2 and day 3. The CRP level was decreased to the normal level around postoperative week 2. D-dimer level was sharply elevated and peaked to 4.5 μg/dl at postoperative day 1. At postoperative day 2, it decreased to baseline level. After then, it slowly elevated again and reached a second peak at postoperative week 2. D-dimer showed a more rapid rise and fall than ESR and CRP in very early postoperative period. The D-dimer test might be effective in early detection of PJI, if combined with levels of ESR and CRP. The postoperative change of D-dimer in our study can serve as a baseline for early diagnosis of PJI.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 6 18%
Student > Postgraduate 5 15%
Student > Master 4 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 12%
Researcher 3 9%
Other 8 24%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 61%
Unspecified 3 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Computer Science 1 3%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 August 2018.
All research outputs
#10,511,403
of 13,807,706 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research
#473
of 756 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#270,533
of 404,842 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research
#1
of 1 outputs
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