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Nasal patency and otorhinolaryngologic-orofacial features in children

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology, January 2019
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Title
Nasal patency and otorhinolaryngologic-orofacial features in children
Published in
Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology, January 2019
DOI 10.1016/j.bjorl.2017.10.014
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jovana de Moura Milanesi, Luana Cristina Berwig, Luiz Henrique Schuch, Rodrigo Agne Ritzel, Ana Maria Toniolo da Silva, Eliane Castilhos Rodrigues Corrêa

Abstract

Nasal obstruction is a common symptom in childhood, related to rhinitis and pharyngeal tonsil hypertrophy. In the presence of nasal obstruction, nasal patency may be reduced, and nasal breathing is replaced by mouth breathing. Orofacial and otorhinolaryngologic changes are related to this breathing mode. Objective evaluation of upper airways may be obtained through nasal patency measurement. To compare nasal patency and otorhinolaryngologic-orofacial features in children. One hundred and twenty three children, 6-12 year-old, and of both sexes underwent speech therapy evaluation, according to Orofacial Myofunctional Evaluation protocol, clinical and endoscopic otorhinolaryngologic examination and nasal patency measurement, using the absolute and predicted (%) peak nasal inspiratory flow values. Lower values of absolute and estimated peak nasal inspiratory flow values were found in children with restless sleep (p=0.006 and p=0.002), nasal obstruction report (p=0.027 and p=0.023), runny nose (p=0.004 and p=0.012), unsystematic lip closure during mastication (p=0.040 and p=0.026), masticatory speed reduced (p=0.006 and p=0.008) and altered solid food swallowing (p=0.006 and p=0.001). Absolute peak nasal inspiratory flow was lower in children with pale inferior turbinate (p=0.040), reduced hard palate width (p=0.037) and altered speech (p=0.004). Higher absolute values were found in children with increased tongue width (p=0.027) and, higher absolute and predicted (%) in children with mild everted lip (p=0.008 and p=0.000). Nasal patency was lower in children with restless sleep, rhinitis signs and symptoms, hard palate width reduced and with changes in mastication, deglutition and speech functions. It is also emphasized that most of the children presented signs and symptom of allergic rhinitis.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 15%
Student > Master 4 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Researcher 3 9%
Other 3 9%
Other 6 18%
Unknown 10 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 15%
Linguistics 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 12 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 February 2018.
All research outputs
#11,115,253
of 12,498,628 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology
#218
of 323 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#235,527
of 273,073 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology
#7
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,498,628 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 323 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,073 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.