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A functional polymorphism in the promoter of the progesterone receptor gene associated with endometrial cancer risk

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, September 2002
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
131 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
Title
A functional polymorphism in the promoter of the progesterone receptor gene associated with endometrial cancer risk
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, September 2002
DOI 10.1073/pnas.192172299
Pubmed ID
Authors

I. De Vivo, G. S. Huggins, S. E. Hankinson, P. J. Lescault, M. Boezen, G. A. Colditz, D. J. Hunter

Abstract

Excessive estrogen stimulation unopposed by progesterone strongly predisposes to endometrial cancer. Because the antiproliferative effect of progesterone requires the progesterone receptor (PR), which exists in two isoforms, PR-A and -B, we reasoned that variants in the PR gene may predispose to endometrial cancer. We found six variable sites, including four polymorphisms in the hPR gene and five common haplotypes. One promoter region polymorphism, +331G/A, creates a unique transcription start site. Biochemical assays showed that the +331G/A polymorphism increases transcription of the PR gene, favoring production of hPR-B in an endometrial cancer cell line. Using a case-control study nested within the Nurses' Health Study cohort, we observed a statistically significant association between the +331G/A polymorphism and the risk of endometrial cancer, which was even greater in overweight women carriers. After including a second population of controls, these associations remained intact. Our findings suggest that the +331G/A hPR gene polymorphism may contribute to endometrial cancer risk by increasing expression of the hPR-B isoform.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 8%
Argentina 1 3%
Unknown 35 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 18%
Professor 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 8%
Other 8 21%
Unknown 5 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Mathematics 1 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 11 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 August 2008.
All research outputs
#3,552,501
of 12,363,892 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#42,783
of 77,317 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,109
of 265,769 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#640
of 983 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,363,892 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 77,317 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.1. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,769 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 983 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.