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Multiple forms of discrimination and relationships with health and wellbeing: findings from national cross-sectional surveys in Aotearoa/New Zealand

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal for Equity in Health, February 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
112 Mendeley
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Title
Multiple forms of discrimination and relationships with health and wellbeing: findings from national cross-sectional surveys in Aotearoa/New Zealand
Published in
International Journal for Equity in Health, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12939-018-0735-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Donna Cormack, James Stanley, Ricci Harris

Abstract

The complex ways in which experiences of discrimination are patterned in society, including the exposure of communities to multiple overlapping forms of discrimination within social systems of oppression, is increasingly recognised in the health sciences. However, research examining the impacts on health and contribution to racial/ethnic health inequities remains limited. This study aims to contribute to the field by exploring the prevalence and patterning of experience of multiple forms of discrimination in Aotearoa/New Zealand, and associations with health and wellbeing. The study's conceptual approach is informed by Kaupapa Māori theory, Ecosocial theory, Critical Race Theory and intersectionality. Data are from the 2008, 2010 and 2012 General Social Surveys (GSS), biennial nationally-representative surveys in Aotearoa/New Zealand. We examined patterning of forms of discrimination in the last 12 months and frequency of experiencing multiple forms of discrimination. We also looked at associations between experience of multiple discrimination and self-rated health, mental health (using SF12), and life satisfaction using logistic regression. We used random effects meta-analysis to produce pooled estimates drawing from all three survey instances. Māori, and people from Pacific and Asian ethnic groups, reported much higher prevalence of racial discrimination, were more likely to have any experience of discrimination, and were also more likely to experience multiple forms of discrimination, in the last year relative to respondents in the European/Other category. Discrimination was associated with poorer self-rated health, poorer mental health, and greater life dissatisfaction in unadjusted and adjusted estimates. Negative health impacts increased as the number of forms of discrimination experienced increased. Discrimination impacts negatively on the health of indigenous peoples and those from minoritised ethnic groups in Aotearoa/New Zealand through higher exposure to racial discrimination, other forms of discrimination, and a greater likelihood of experiencing multiple forms of discrimination. This supports the need for research and interventions that more fully account for the multiple and interlocking ways in which discrimination impacts on health in racialised social hierarchies to maintain systems of privilege and oppression.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 112 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 21 19%
Researcher 13 12%
Student > Master 12 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 9%
Student > Postgraduate 8 7%
Other 20 18%
Unknown 28 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 26 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 19%
Social Sciences 14 13%
Psychology 8 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 3%
Other 7 6%
Unknown 33 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 June 2018.
All research outputs
#1,274,244
of 13,786,654 outputs
Outputs from International Journal for Equity in Health
#209
of 1,153 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,955
of 270,958 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal for Equity in Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,786,654 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,153 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,958 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them