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Analysis of microbial sequences in plasma cell-free DNA for early-onset breast cancer patients and healthy females

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Genomics, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
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Title
Analysis of microbial sequences in plasma cell-free DNA for early-onset breast cancer patients and healthy females
Published in
BMC Medical Genomics, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12920-018-0329-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yu-Feng Huang, Yen-Ju Chen, Tan-Chi Fan, Nai-Chuan Chang, Yi-Jie Chen, Mohit K. Midha, Tzu-Han Chen, Hsiao-Hsiang Yang, Yu-Tai Wang, Alice L. Yu, Kuo-Ping Chiu

Abstract

Cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA) is becoming a useful biopsy for noninvasive diagnosis of diseases. Microbial sequences in plasma cfDNA may provide important information to improve prognosis and treatment. We have developed a stringent method to identify microbial species via microbial cfDNA in the blood plasma of early-onset breast cancer (EOBC) patients and healthy females. Empirically, microbe-originated sequence reads were identified by mapping non-human PE reads in cfDNA libraries to microbial databases. Those mapped concordantly to unique microbial species were assembled into contigs, which were subsequently aligned to the same databases. Microbial species uniquely aligned were identified and compared across all individuals on MCRPM (Microbial CfDNA Reads Per Million quality PE reads) basis. The predominant microbial cfDNAs in all plasma samples examined are originated from bacteria and these bacteria were limited to only a few genera. Among those, Acinetobacter johnsonii XBB1 and low levels of Mycobacterium spp. were commonly found in all healthy females, but also present in an EOBC patient. Compared to those in healthy counterparts, bacterial species in EOBC patients are more diverse and more likely to present at high levels. Among these three EOBC patients tested, a patient who has record high titer (2,724 MCRPM) of Pseudomonas mendocina together with 8.82 MCRPM of Pannonibacter phragmitetus has passed away; another patient infected by multiple Sphingomonas species remains alive; while the third patient who has similar microbial species (Acinetobacter johnsonii XBB1) commonly seen in normal controls is having a normal life. Our preliminary data on the profiles of microbial cfDNA sequences suggested that it may have some prognostic value in cancer patients. Validation in larger number of patients is warranted.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Researcher 4 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 15%
Student > Postgraduate 3 11%
Student > Master 3 11%
Other 5 19%
Unknown 4 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 26%
Engineering 3 11%
Computer Science 2 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 4 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2019.
All research outputs
#2,183,951
of 14,465,534 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Genomics
#118
of 765 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,971
of 274,396 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Genomics
#1
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,465,534 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 765 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,396 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.