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Novel insights into freshwater hydrocarbon-rich sediments using metatranscriptomics: Opening the black box

Overview of attention for article published in Water Research, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
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Title
Novel insights into freshwater hydrocarbon-rich sediments using metatranscriptomics: Opening the black box
Published in
Water Research, June 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.watres.2018.02.039
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas Reid, Subba Rao Chaganti, Ian G. Droppo, Christopher G. Weisener

Abstract

Baseline biogeochemical surveys of natural environments is an often overlooked field of environmental studies. Too often research begins once contamination has occurred, with a knowledge gap as to how the affected area behaved prior to outside (often anthropogenic) influences. These baseline characterizations can provide insight into proposed bioremediation strategies crucial in cleaning up chemical spill sites or heavily mined regions. Hence, this study was conducted to survey the in-situ microbial activity within freshwater hydrocarbon-rich environments cutting through the McMurray formation - the geologic strata constituting the oil sands. We are the first to report in-situ functional variations among these freshwater microbial ecosystems using metatranscriptomics, providing insight into the in-situ gene expression within these naturally hydrocarbon-rich sites. Key genes involved in energy metabolism (nitrogen, sulfur and methane) and hydrocarbon degradation, including transcripts relating to the observed expression of methane oxidation are reported. This information provides better linkages between hydrocarbon impacted environments, closing knowledge gaps for optimizing not only oil sands mine reclamation but also enhancing microbial reclamation strategies in various freshwater environments. These finding can also be applied to existing contaminated environments, in need of efficient reclamation efforts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 24%
Student > Master 13 24%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Researcher 4 7%
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 10 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 15 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 13%
Engineering 6 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 15 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 September 2018.
All research outputs
#7,078,124
of 13,789,144 outputs
Outputs from Water Research
#3,369
of 6,614 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,375
of 271,547 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Water Research
#54
of 193 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,789,144 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,614 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,547 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 193 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.