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Prevalence of molecular markers of artemisinin and lumefantrine resistance among patients with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in three provinces in Angola, 2015

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, February 2018
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Prevalence of molecular markers of artemisinin and lumefantrine resistance among patients with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in three provinces in Angola, 2015
Published in
Malaria Journal, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2233-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dragan Ljolje, Pedro Rafael Dimbu, Julia Kelley, Ira Goldman, Douglas Nace, Aleixo Macaia, Eric S. Halsey, Pascal Ringwald, Filomeno Fortes, Venkatachalam Udhayakumar, Eldin Talundzic, Naomi W. Lucchi, Mateusz M. Plucinski

Abstract

Artemisinin-based combination therapy is the first-line anti-malarial treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum infection in Angola. To date, the prevalence of polymorphisms in the pfk13 gene, associated with artemisinin resistance, and pfmdr1, associated with lumefantrine resistance, have not been systematically studied in Angola. DNA was isolated from pretreatment and late treatment failure dried blood spots collected during the 2015 round of therapeutic efficacy studies in Benguela, Lunda Sul, and Zaire Provinces in Angola. The pfk13 propeller domain and pfmdr1 gene were sequenced and analysed for polymorphisms. Pfmdr1 copy number variation was assessed using a real-time PCR method. The association between pfmdr1 and pfk13 mutations and treatment failure was investigated. The majority of pretreatment (99%, 466/469) and all late treatment failure (100%, 50/50) samples were wild type for pfk13. Three of the pretreatment samples (1%) carried the A578S mutation commonly observed in Africa and not associated with artemisinin resistance. All 543 pretreatment and day of late treatment failure samples successfully analysed for pfmdr1 copy number variation carried one copy of pfmdr1. The NYD haplotype was the predominant pfmdr1 haplotype, present in 63% (308/491) of pretreatment samples, followed by NFD, which was present in 32% (157/491) of pretreatment samples. The pfmdr1 N86 allele was overrepresented in day of late treatment failure samples from participants receiving artemether-lumefantrine (p value 0.03). The pretreatment parasites in patients participating in therapeutic efficacy studies in 2015 in Angola's three sentinel sites showed genetic evidence of susceptibility to artemisinins, consistent with clinical outcome data showing greater than 99% day 3 clearance rates. The lack of increased pfmdr1 copy number is consistent with previous reports from sub-Saharan Africa. Although pfmdr1 NYD and NFD haplotypes were overrepresented in artemether-lumefantrine late treatment failure samples, their role as markers of resistance was unclear given that these haplotypes were also present in the majority of successfully treated patients in the artemether-lumefantrine treatment arms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 21%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Student > Master 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Other 6 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 17%
Unspecified 3 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 8%
Other 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 March 2018.
All research outputs
#3,343,474
of 12,582,044 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,123
of 3,681 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,644
of 271,542 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,582,044 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,681 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,542 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them