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Do Current Fortification and Supplementation Programs Assure Adequate Intake of Fat-Soluble Vitamins in Belgian Infants, Toddlers, Pregnant Women, and Lactating Women?

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrients, February 2018
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28 Mendeley
Title
Do Current Fortification and Supplementation Programs Assure Adequate Intake of Fat-Soluble Vitamins in Belgian Infants, Toddlers, Pregnant Women, and Lactating Women?
Published in
Nutrients, February 2018
DOI 10.3390/nu10020223
Pubmed ID
Authors

Isabelle Moyersoen, Carl Lachat, Koenraad Cuypers, Karin De Ridder, Brecht Devleesschauwer, Jean Tafforeau, Stefanie Vandevijvere, Margot Vansteenland, Bruno De Meulenaer, John Van Camp, Herman Van Oyen

Abstract

Abstracts: Adequate intakes of fat-soluble vitamins are essential to support the growth and development of the foetus, the neonate, and the young child. By means of an online self-administered frequency questionnaire, this study aimed to evaluate the intake of vitamins A, D, E, and K in Belgian infants (n= 455), toddlers (n= 265), pregnant women (n= 161), and lactating women (n= 165). The contribution of foods, fortified foods, and supplements on the total intake was quantified. 5% of toddlers, 16% of pregnant women, and 35% of lactating women had an inadequate vitamin A intake. Conversely, excessive vitamin A intakes were associated with consumption of liver (products). Furthermore, 22% of infants were at risk for inadequate vitamin D intake due to the lack of prophylaxis, while consumption of highly dosed supplements posed a risk for excessive intakes in 6%-26% of infants. Vitamin D intake in pregnant women and lactating women was inadequate (median of 51%, respectively, 60% of the adequate intake). In all groups, the risk for inadequate intake of vitamin E and K was low. Contribution of fortified foods to vitamin A, D, E, and K intake was minor, except in toddlers. National fortification strategies should be investigated as an alternative or additional strategy to prevent vitamin D and A deficiency. There is a need to revise and set uniform supplement recommendations. Finally, non-users of vitamin D prophylaxis need to be identified for targeted treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 8 29%
Student > Bachelor 6 21%
Student > Master 4 14%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Professor 2 7%
Other 6 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 8 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Other 5 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 January 2019.
All research outputs
#7,951,716
of 13,199,565 outputs
Outputs from Nutrients
#3,668
of 5,638 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#147,994
of 268,965 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrients
#218
of 304 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,199,565 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,638 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.1. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,965 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 304 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.